exam3 - Exam 3 Terms Issue Voters D: people who may make...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–9. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Exam 3 Terms
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Issue Voters D: people who may make voting decisions based on the candidates' stance on single issues. EX:"pro-life" or "pro-choice", support for gun rights or gun-control S:it gives a distorted impression of what the real political line exists at. For example, a person who votes for a socially conservative Republican candidate, based solely on his or her support of gun rights, may not necessarily share the candidate's other views on social issues, such as abortion.
Background image of page 2
Turnout Pg 271 D: percentage of eligible individuals who actually vote. S: US turnout is very low, about 50% of eligible participants actually participate in presidential elections, the figures go smaller in local and state government elections.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Pivotal Voter Someone who breaks the tie when votes are split evenly between candidates. Many people use the logic that they are not likely to be the pivotal voter so they abstain. If Obama and Clinton tied for votes in the state of California by the time you reached the polls your vote would make you the pivotal voter and decide the outcome.
Background image of page 4
D-Term It’s the additional benefit that one gets from the act of voting factored in to the paradox of voting equation. It is the reason why people vote because they believe that it is their duty to vote regardless of costs outweighing the benefits. Civic responsibility because some people feel that it is their responsibility to vote for their country.
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Mobilization vs. Conversion The difference between getting out your supporters to vote and getting people who already vote to change their vote for your candidate. Mobilize supporters Inattentive public may not vote. Easier to lower costs of voting than to convert opponents. Converting the vote/supporters Strategy for political campaigns S: can determine candidate’s reputation/election outcome/etc EX: ron paul/barack obama known for converting. etc
Background image of page 6
Rational Abstention The idea that it is rational to abstain from voting because the costs always outweigh the benefits. This is the reason for a lack of turnout at the polls and the need for mobilization of the voters. If you plan on voting and a potential lover asks you to lunch, you go to lunch because its more important to you than voting.
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
“Work Your District” D: Through casework, town meetings, and everyday interactions with local constituents, a politician is able to have a direct effect on his voting outcome simply by having a reputation of availability. “Tuesday to Thursday Club” are politicians that only fly in for work from Tuesday to Thursday and live at their homes the rest of the week so they can seen as family oriented and available for their voters. Ex:New book from congressman when you have a newborn, Al cover, political
Background image of page 8
Image of page 9
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 33

exam3 - Exam 3 Terms Issue Voters D: people who may make...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 9. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online