Development of Christian Document-net.docx - Chapter 2 On...

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Chapter 2. On the Antecedent Argument in behalf of Developments in Christian Doctrine Section 1. Developments of Doctrine to be Expected Objections Indications: Application in varying circumstances Questions not answered by Scripture Method of revelation in Scripture Political developments in Scripture Structure and style of Scripture Parables Analogy of natural world Section 2. Infallible Developing Authority to be Expected Developments Probable—What are they? Need for Authoritative Sanction Probable Existence of External Authority Objections Infallibility as difficult to prove as Development Infallibility precludes exercise of Faith Analogy of Nature Bible as infallible Authority Present Need for Infallible Authority Development Under Infallible Authority vs. Alternatives Section 3. The Existing Developments of Doctrine the Probable Fulfilment of that Expectation No Development Comparable to Catholic General Opinion of Catholic System Catholic Church the Church of Sts. Ambrose and Athanasius Notes —NR
Top | Contents | Works | Home Section 1. Developments of Doctrine to be Expected {55} 1. I F Christianity is a fact, and impresses an idea of itself on our minds and is a subject-matter of exercises of the reason, that idea will in course of time expand into a multitude of ideas, and aspects of ideas, connected and harmonious with one another, and in themselves determinate and immutable, as is the objective fact itself which is thus represented. It is a characteristic of our minds, that they cannot take an object in, which is submitted to them simply and integrally. We conceive by means of definition or description; whole objects do not create in the intellect whole ideas, but are, to use a mathematical phrase, thrown into series, into a number of statements, strengthening, interpreting, correcting each other, and with more or less exactness approximating, as they accumulate, to a perfect image. There is no other way of learning or of teaching. We cannot teach except by aspects or views, which are not identical with the thing itself which we are teaching. Two persons may each convey the same truth to a third, yet by methods and through representations {56} altogether different. The same person will treat the same argument differently in an essay or speech, according to the accident of the day of writing, or of the audience, yet it will be substantially the same. And the more claim an idea has to be considered living, the more various will be its aspects; and the more social and political is its nature, the more complicated and subtle will be its issues, and the longer and more eventful will be its course. And in the number of these special ideas, which from their very depth and richness cannot be fully understood at once, but are more and more clearly expressed and taught the longer they last,—having aspects many and bearings many, mutually connected and growing one out of another, and all parts of a whole, with a sympathy and correspondence

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