PSYCH 9B.pdf - Memory I u25cf Gist remembered better than...

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Memory I. Gist : remembered better than detail Reconstructive view of memory Memory = events + schematic knowledge (what we expect in the memory) + other experiences + expectations Schema : knowledge of typical components of an experience Expectations, when you go to ex) lecture, date, etc . - How you fill in blanks when you don’t have the perfect memory Schematic intrusions and Mandela effect ex) curious George with a tail Verbal labels can distort visual memories Intrusions Schematic knowledge: association of things you would think that would be there Journal 1: #1 Library : books, table, chair, computer, printer, snacks, speaker - You would be more likely to misremeber things that don’t fit into your schema Semantic association: - words that are associated with each other shows confidence for incorrect information Journal 1: #2 -banana, apple, strawberry, kiwi, avocado, tangerine, pumpkin, lemon, seaweed, granola Memories can be distorted by false suggestions provided by other people after the event Sequential presentation Remembering = “reconstructing” not reciting - Good but can lead to error Journal 1 #3 Mandela effect: chick fil a logo Three dots above the chicken or four Occurs by false memories and misinformation and misremembering Memory II. memory stages and processes (the neural basis of memory) part 1. Journal 1 #4 part 1. Memory is something you remember caused by things like experiences, this can range from learning in a classroom to daily activities like going to sleep. Memory is something that has occurred previously. Memory: the nervous system capacity to retain and retrieve skills and knowledge. Flawed and reconstructive Processing of information Result of brain activity
information processing model of memory Acquisition or encoding - turning sensory stimuli into a form that can be stored in memory (neural code) Storage - retention of information in memory trace (affects the nervous system) Consolidation - strengthening of existing memories Retrieval - bringing stored information into awareness where it can be reviewed Properties of memory stages: 1. Capacity - how much information can be maintained 2. Duration - how long info stays there Sensory memory: Sensory memory persists for ⅓ of a second then progressively fades Journal 1 #5 It was critical that the tone was not played until after because it would’ve affected what they were going to pay attention to. Chunking : way to group info into units Journal 1 #6 An example of chunking that is meaningful to me is chunking phone numbers in two’s. Another example of chunking that isn’t meaningful to me is combining letters and numbers into four’s. I find that two’s works best for me because it’s easier to process and remember. Memory II Part II Items need to be rehearsed in the short term memory before entering long term memory Relatively permanent Birthday parties, the first day of school, movies Primacy effect (beginning of list) Recency (end of the list) Distractor task: after last item removes recency effect (ex. counting)

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