FoS_Chem_I_Assignment

FoS_Chem_I_Assignment - Question 1. How many possibilities?...

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Unformatted text preview: Question 1. How many possibilities? As Professor Nuckolls mentioned during lecture, almost all the synthetic compounds we come into contact with on a day-to-day basis are composed of four elements: C, H, N, and O. An amazing variety of compounds can be made from these basic building blocks. Recall that hydrogen generally just completes the number of bonds that each C, N, or O needs, and doesnt make up the backbone of a molecule. For example, carbon always needs four bonds, so a 1- carbon backbone will be CH 4 . With a 2-carbon backbone, each carbon needs 3 more bonds (after the C-C bond is counted) so the formula is CH 3 CH 3 and a 3-carbon backbone would have the chemical formula CH 3 CH 2 CH 3 . The chemical structures are shown belownote that any place where lines begin, end, meet, or bend there is a carbonsince this is the default molecule, chemists dont draw them. Also, its assumed that there are always enough hydrogens to fill in so often, structures are drawn without Hs either and they are represented as just a...
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course SCNC c1000 taught by Professor Demenocal during the Spring '08 term at Columbia.

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FoS_Chem_I_Assignment - Question 1. How many possibilities?...

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