6 - CHEM 2800 Quantitative Analytical Chemistry Dr...

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CHEM 2800 Quantitative Analytical Chemistry Dr. Christopher R. Dockery
Contact info Dr. Christopher R. Dockery SC 410 • 678-797-2047 [email protected] Office hours: open door policy or by appointment E-mail is a great way to get a quick question answered. Place a descriptive subject line in the e-mail and fully identify yourself to ensure your message is not moved to the spam folder!!
Grading and Evaluation Sapling HW 25% • Exams 50% Final Exam 25%
Sapling HW Sapling HW will be online and the average of all online HW will account for 25% of your final grade. It is critically important that your user name in sapling exactly matches your name on the official class roll. Please check your name on your owlexpress account before you continue. Once you have registered and enrolled, you can log in at any time to complete or review your homework assignments. During sign up - and throughout the term - if you have any technical problems or grading issues, send an email to [email protected] explaining the issue. The Sapling support team is almost always more able (and faster) to resolve issues than your instructor.
Exams Tentative Test Schedule (subject to change) Exam 1 Ch 0-5 Monday, September 12 Exam 2 Ch 6-10 Monday, October 10 Exam 3 Ch 11, 13-14 Monday, November 7 Cumulative Final Exam Monday, December 9, 10:30-12:30 Ch 0-11, 13-15, 17-19, 22-24
General Class Info Chapters 0-2 & parts of 3 are review. It is your responsibility to review this information.
What do Analytical Chemists Do?
The Analytical Process 1. Formulating the question – What is the concentration of lead in the drinking water? 2. Select analytical procedures – Is there an established method for lead in water? – Do we have the available resources?
3. Sampling – How long should the water fountain run? – How many fountains should we test? 4. Sample preparation – Converting the sample into a form suitable for chemical analysis – Can the drinking water be analyzed directly? – Should it be filtered? – Should the pH be adjusted?
5. Analysis – What is an appropriate blank? – How many replicate measurements should be tested? 6. Reporting and interpretation – Deliver a clearly written report. – Address limitations of the method.
7. Draw conclusions – Is the drinking water safe? The majority of the class will focus on the theory behind chemical analysis Towards the end of the semester, we will look at modern instrumental methods – Discussion of selecting and implementing chemical analysis
Course Outline Introduction to statistics and calibration Complex Chemical equilibria Volumetric analysis Complexometric analysis Potentiometric analysis Spectroscopic analysis Chromatographic analysis
Uncertainty and Statistics
There is uncertainty (error) in every measurement 1 From the measuring device From the object being measured From the analyst From the environment 1 – Not a recommended tactic when getting pulled for speeding
…so the power of a number is

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