Exam 1 CE490 - #7"v I,c)A,1 A Transportation...

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Unformatted text preview: / #7.]? "v I? ,c )A/ ,1 A Transportation Engineering "1' ‘ Exam 1 Fall 2007 Name PROBLEM 1. A freeway in Wausau is known to follow Greenshield’s (linear speed-density relation). The free speed is 72 mph and the jam density is 120 vehicles per lane-mile. What is the capacity for a single lane? What are the volume and average headway for a single lane when the speed is 40 miles per hour? (8 points) ' i , , AM” iféé whee-y P“ W- 72“ Coyacl‘L? :- _ /" PROBLEM 2. A two lane road has an average daily traffic of 11,200 vehicles. Estimate the directional design hourly volume for this road, using the 100th highest hour standard (Wisconsin) and a directional spit of 60/40. (4 points) V lg PROBLEM 3. A one—way road is near a school. The volume on that road is 120 vehicles per hour, Poisson distributed, during times children are present. A minimum acceptable headway for children crossing the road is 30 seconds. What is the probability that any given headway is acceptable? (4 points) ' v 1/) '_ 3‘ V: {20 ; pl: ( 50m” '11:; run _ f PROBLEM 4. What is the LOS for a My with an hourly digggtjonal volume of 3600 v h? What is the'density in passenger cars per mile? The prevailing conditions are listed below. State all assumptions. (8 points) ll foot lanes E7- ‘~ l1g > 6 foot shoulders, both sides ( T— O ‘7 g Experienced drivers 1‘ 51‘?" I“) 1C 2 ' ‘fl/ 1‘ ( .5 '1) k 0 0% RV’s I f- o / . 10% trucks PeakhOur factor=0.90 \f w M 7—“ [V03.5I Pc//I\ /L/\ @ Urban area, Base Free F lowjjlflimph f o .0) 0195 1‘ 0‘) Level terrain g, 1 interchange per mile I - —-J; is, - it? / F F5 ,. ge: PS Lw Lo #0 Lo.) 1% :2. 701%!“ " Ital 3’0_ 2’6. L ‘1‘" o. 0 PROBLEM 5. Estimate the percent time spent following (using the HCM procedure) for a two W (Class I) with an anticipated peak hour volume of 1260 vehicles per hourain both directions and 40% no passing zones and a 60/40 directional split. Otherwise, assume ideal conditions (no trucks, level terrain, etc.). The base free flow speed is 60 mph and the peak hour factor @090. If the average travel speed in 34 mph, What is the level of service? (8 points) in V9 .- l p9 T/WZ 56/41” 7' Faucywiva Q5 " [,0 VF: [290 £9. .- $€T§P~apfl0<gw e 772ch) [9'00 6’“ h new web V raw!” re .. P 04"! (IX A $9,040!) u. 370 9th §\ 2 {$10 {3:}; "52.2 m“ >> a?" 30:32: ‘ /”‘ \ ' \ PROBLEM 6. A toll booth on a single-lane on-ramp can process vehicles at an average rate of 120 per hour, Poisson distributed. Vehicles arrive randomly at an average rate of 80 per hour, Poisson distributed. (a) What is the average waiting time in the system? (b) What is the average length of the queue? Hint: This is an M/M/l queue. (6 points) i [4 :- i291.) V?\\ )3 7— 80 wok \— W L /"*>x 310;; cal.» 4 IW 0% ii = e, 73 “Ir/m + Min/we ‘; Be: 2 «ff; 1’? \ u... 'J“ 1’ 6AM"? lw *gh l _’ \ \ ._\-—- X 8? f" 2 r ,3, (357 a‘ w. A .——__. ’/“’ $50 vf’o yam main» ..~ / (QM/cal"? gfo, 017 hALbi I mr‘n/vekm/}rfl3 iv”? o..- (I t.‘ :1; (Doc h/VLL. : 54;“ (I .f s l I ae.. TEM- +104" IV] \ M PROBLEM 7. A freeway with three lanes in one direction has one of its lanes blocked for a long term work zone. The capacity W. Outside of a peak two-hour period (4 to _6 pm), traffic is very liéhtffiétween 4 and 5 pm, the upstream traffic volume is a constant 4500 vehicles per hour. Between 5 and 6 pm, the upstream traffic is a constant 3000 vph. Sketch a cumulative flow (queuing) diagram showing both the arrival and departure curves for these two hours. What is the maximum length of the queue? For how long does the queue exist? What is the longest time a vehicle must wait within the queue? Hint: you can easily read all the numbers off a carefully drawn diagram. (8 points) Extra Credit V/ PROBLEM A. Previously the toll only took exact change. Then, the averageservice rate was 140 vehicles per hour and service times were constant. How much did theperformance of the toll both change as compared to present circumstances? (2 points) //’ Ilt/t PROBLEM B. Refer to PROBLEM 6. What is the aver/age delay across all vehicles that arrive during the two hours? (2 points) 7 I/ 1/. // fir/f PROBLEM C. Refer to PROBLEM l. A better modelof traffic flow for this road is: 2 “<5 S=S 1——D— =~7Z [’ ‘ [Way ‘ f D j if” . What is the capacity with this model? (3 points) {in a x/L/r’. I / / PROBLEM D. Refer to PROBLEM I. A detector on this freewayhasran;:effectiye length of 10 feet and an average vehicle is 20 feet long. What is the “apparent”’6‘ccupancvxat/this detector w when the speed is 40 mph? (2 points) f I [J +zo 75% e "277" Tl‘ 0V4‘V+I'CM ES udng ' gm 4. M50535; mi 07 m aw” .- 5-Q 95/4 -= mum/ff mac; 1)”: LzoO~40/7;); 53.3 «L/Mm'. one»: Saga-+0 ='- 7433', h S Sew/ma —- \-6°£ aer— C13 WW .2 “7.0.54? o.é 9‘ 0,95 -= 8450 “A, ® 7’65: 0‘3 MC") }: lath/WM; ?Y* #53: é‘)*°: C,” 05462 = 0.37 (4) PH =7o~\fi=—3 ~25 = 42.4; “any Aw“ (MM “5,0 s 035 \‘p~‘ 3900/(5d‘05’l54‘036-Il‘1) = )Vtos', 5=/ 6.1.6} Cb.- 14t23/52.6: 12-4 oc/M/m'n MW £N,=\ ‘) £QQ= -) \l‘} -'-' \ZGO/O.°\ "-1 W07); Siffsvr \OD(\- 60.00097q4§\40¢)=1b.8 VTSF‘ = away—x: 76,27») 5=34r a has he: 11m = «L; map = 4a; keg; = \1 Man = 31.5 QM,— ‘AM# .7 7.3 MW qmwas (19! (to ma“ ...
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