Psy119-chapter10 - Chapter 10 Sex Gender Childhood...

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Childhood Chapter 10 Sex & Gender: An Introduction (5 th Edition) Hilary M. Lips Constructing Gender
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In Emphasizing the Social Forces that Contribute to the Gendering of Children’s Conceptions of Themselves and the World Chapter 10 asks : How do parents contribute to children’s early gender learning? What role do the media play in teaching children about gender? How does our use of language reinforce these messages about gender ?
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In Emphasizing the Social Forces that Contribute to the Gendering of Children’s Conceptions of Themselves and the World Chapter 10 asks : Are boys and girls encouraged to construct different kind of “selves”? Is the process of forming friendships gendered? Are girls and boys encouraged to take different approaches to choosing and achieving goals for themselves?
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Sources of Early Gender Learning Sources of Early Gender Learning Parents: the first source of children’s gender learning They hold and communicate different expectations for boys and girls Media TV, video games, the printed word all reinforce gender stereotypes Language Contains built-in biases about gender
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Overview: Overview: Parents and Gender Role Parents and Gender Role Socialization Socialization Parental expectations for girls and boys begin to differ even before the child is born On many dimensions there are only small and insignificant differences in the ways parents treat their sons and daughters. However, they do treat boys and girls differently in areas specifically associated with gender expectations, such as toys, clothing, and participation in house hold tasks. Some research shows that parents interact differently with sons and daughters: talking more to daughters and playing more actively with sons Ethnicity and race interact with gender in the ways parents socialize their children
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Media Media By age 20, the typical American adolescent has watched some 600,000 television commercials Commercials convey stereotypic messages; for example, female characters are more likely than males to have beautiful bodies and wear skimpy clothing Female characters in prime-time TV shows are twice as likely as male characters to receive comments about their bodies TV viewing is related to gender stereotypic attitudes among children and teenagers
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Language Language Labels help children to form gender categories In English, the masculine gender is used to refer to people in general Research shows the use of the masculine pronoun makes people think of males Guidelines for gender-egalitarian language
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course PSYCH 119 taught by Professor Ericson during the Fall '06 term at Western Washington.

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Psy119-chapter10 - Chapter 10 Sex Gender Childhood...

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