The Moral Permissibility of the Death Penalty

The Moral Permissibility of the Death Penalty - Brian...

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Unformatted text preview: Brian Duncan The Moral Permissiblity of the Death Penalty (2) Nathanson argues that the death penalty is inconsistent with our values of justice, beginning by stating that in for the death penalty to be consistant with our values of justice it would require that the people punished by the death penalty are the ones who deserve punishment (Nathanson 130). Our values of justice are our value of the respect of human and our value of our pursuit of justice (Nathanson 125). The death penalty violates these values through the killing and punishment of innocent people, therefore it should not be put into practice even if it is justified in theory (Nathanson 130). Nathanson feels that this argument for the death penalty goes beyond its theoretical moral permissibility and into its actual outcome. He feels that if death penalty supporters looked at their own values and realize that the death penalty now, and most probably in the future, is inconsistent with them. Nathanson goes on to explain why the death penalty is inconsistent with these values that we hold as a society. Nathanson claims that a just system would need to be in place for the death penalty to hold a chance to be just. He states that this system would require a criteria that distinguishes between the murderers who deserve capital punishment and those that dont. Also, more importantly, he feels that the system must be able to separate the innocent from the guilty, and if it is unable to do this then it is unjust (Nathanson 130). According to Nathanson, there are irrelevant factors that come into play in assigning the death penalty as it is currently in practice. He goes on to cite race, socio- economic status, and quality of legal representation (Nathanson 130). Nathanson states that these factors are impossible to root out, and therefore capital punishment needs to be...
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course PHI 2630 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at FSU.

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The Moral Permissibility of the Death Penalty - Brian...

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