lecture4

lecture4 - Homework, due next Monday Ch.1.2. Odd nos. 1.3....

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Homework, due next Monday Ch.1.2. Odd nos. 1.3. Provide counter-examples for the following arguments from 1.3 A, B and C (Ignore the instructions in the book): A 3, 4, 7, 11, 14, 15; B 8; C 9, 11 2.1 A 1, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 10, 11, 12, 15, 17, 20 2.2 A 1, 5, 7, 12, 13, 14, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20
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Informal Fallacies Fallacies are errors in reasoning. Some fallacies are common and can be psychologically persuasive. Over this course, we’re going to discuss a number of informal fallacies . These are discussed in chapter 4 of the textbook.
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Argument against the person (Ad Hominem). See Layman, ch. 4.1.1 Ad hominem fallacies attempt to discredit an argument by discrediting the arguer . Example, Allan Ginsberg argued in favor of legalizing pornography, but Ginsberg was a no-good, dope-smoking Beatnik, so clearly his arguments were no good. This passage doesn’t address Ginsberg’s arguments . Even if Ginsberg was a ‘no-good, dope smoking beatnik’, it doesn’t follow that his argument is no good, or that his conclusion is false.
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Ad Hominem Abusive The general pattern here is something like: 1) A argued that p 2) A is an idiot… So, 3) not p/A’s argument is no good. Note though that facts about a person’s character can be relevant in arguments. For example: Brown claims that he saw Jones kill Smith. But Brown is a pathological liar, and will greatly benefit if Jones goes to prison, so we shouldn’t accept his testimony
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Ad Hominem Abusive Also note that sometimes someone will argue that someone is stupid, immoral, or whatever. This may not be nice, but it isn’t a fallacy (unless
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This note was uploaded on 04/08/2008 for the course PHIL 3 taught by Professor Way during the Spring '08 term at UCSB.

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lecture4 - Homework, due next Monday Ch.1.2. Odd nos. 1.3....

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