PAM 330 Study Guide - PAM 330 Study Guide Needs Assessment...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
PAM 330 Study Guide: Needs Assessment: What are the needs of the given population? Is there a need for program X? What needs should be addressed by program X? Qualitative study: o Surveys and focus groups o Positive impact or Are there better alternatives? Assessment of Program Theory How is the program supposed to work? Is it plausible the program will work? Impact/Outcome Evaluation To what extent does the program cause the change in desired outcomes? What are the externalities? Program theory: Service utilization plan How are services provided Program organizational plan  Who/what is needed to provide services o Facilities, personnel, activities Impact theory
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
How program causes desired outcomes Proximal v. Distal Outcomes – direct effects v. ultimate desired effects Program Theory Steps: 1. Define the boundary of a program, which components will be evaluated 2. Identify program functions, components, and activities 3. Define the goals and objectives 4. Articulate how program functions relate to the goals and objectives Assessing Program Theory: 1. Are the social problems being addressed real? 2. Are the steps of the impact theory plausible and consistent with previous research? 3. Is outcome data available? Causal Reasoning: Rubin’s Causal Model Causes: S(u)=cause or treatment S(u)=t (treatment), S(u)=c (control) Potential Outcomes: Yt(u)= outcome if exposed to treatment Yc(u)= outcome if exposed to control Causal Effect: Yt(u)-Yc(u) The same group exposure and measurement of the difference in outcomes. Fundamental Problem of Causal Inference:
Image of page 2
You can only observe one outcome for a group (either treatment or control). Counterfactual = other treatment that a given group would receive, but can’t because of  temporal stability. Solutions to FPCI: 1) Effects of causes are the same over time, and not affected by previous experience. a. Expose u to t and then u to c and observe. b. Temporal stability 2) Unit homogeneity a. For two units u1 & u2, they respond equally to both treatment and control  procedures. b. Common in laboratory scientific studies, not with humans. 3) ‘The Statistical Solution’: independence of S a. Randomized control trial, by which differences between groups are spread  equally between groups.
Image of page 3

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern