2.6-2.8 - American Foreign Policy February 6, 2007...

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American Foreign Policy 06/02/2007 16:10:00 February 6, 2007 1905-1906: 1 st Moroccan Crisis (Tangiers) 1908-1909: Bosnian Crisis 1911: 2 nd Moroccan Crisis (Agadir) 1912-1913: 1 st Balkan War 1914: Franz Ferdinand shot, WWI on 1915: Lusitania sinks 1917: U.S. enters war; Russian Revolution 1918: WWI ends 1918-1920 or 1922: Russian Civil War 1898: we’re a great power! First time we don’t have expectation of making Hawaiians and Samoans our citizens Doubt of war’s necessity washed away by glory of victory Geopolitics: Mahan and McKidner Strategic choke points Sea and land politics Germany At some level, there is something to geography as influencing global politics
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Finish: 1870-1910 China and the Philippines Americans in the Philippines; Filipinos wants us out, but can’t win conventional war vs. United States So, they switch to guerilla tactics In response, we put people in ‘concentration camps’ to keep them in one place A lot of people die from disease, malnutrition, and famine U.S. practices scorched-earth tactics against Filipinos o In charge: General Arthur McArthur 4300 Americans die; 20,000 Filipino fighters and 250,000 civilians die Open Door Notes After China and Japan have fight in 1895 Deaths in Peiking horrify foreign powers; Europe comes in to quell Boxer rebellion European troops, under German general, unite Panama Canal and Roosevelt Corollary Clayton-Bulwer treaty: U.S. and Britain will consult over Panama
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technically owned by Colombia; Colombia can’t control it and U.S. had to intervene to stabilize Panama 1900: U.S. wants to abandon treaty; Britain, with its own problems, ignores U.S. builds canal after Panamanians declare independence Roosevelt Corollary : offshoot of Monroe Doctrine; says that, in cases of instability or impotence, and international force can come in to stabilize “international” basically means Americans policy of ‘don’t just stand there, do something’ Corollary actually violates Monroe Doctrine, which was for revolution rather than intervention Indicative of growing U.S. power America Eyes Japan Russia tries to build railroads eastward; Japan is upset, and they fight Results in war; Russia loses, but it was extremely costly for both sides Roosevelt sweeps in and wins Noble Peace Prize Russia pays the price and has a revolution, which gets put down; still, it is clear that the Czar is on unstable footing Another consequence: U.S. becomes wary of Japan, which is a great power Roosevelt sends Great White Fleet around the world to showcase U.S. power and intimidate Japan Conclusions 1) success of incremental conquest
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one war at a time was very profitable 2) short and hard wars: many wars are ‘short and hard’ when people are losing wars, they cut their losses and get out (e. .g war of 1812) 3) power has a lot to do with one’s GDP
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This note was uploaded on 04/08/2008 for the course POLS W3631 taught by Professor Parent during the Spring '08 term at Columbia.

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2.6-2.8 - American Foreign Policy February 6, 2007...

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