Introductory Welsh Lecture 5 Notes - XX I drank of the wine and the mead of the Mordei And because I drank I fell by the edge of a gleaming

Introductory Welsh Lecture 5 Notes - XX I drank of the...

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XX. I drank of the wine and the mead of the Mordei, And because I drank, I fell by the edge of a gleaming sword, [112a] Not without desiring a hero’s prowess; [112b] And when all fell, thou didst also fall. [112c] Thus when the issue comes, it were well not to have sinned. Present, in his thrusting course, showed a bold and mighty arm. [112d] XXI. The heroes who marched to Cattraeth were renowned, Wine and mead out of golden goblets was their beverage, That year was to them one of exalted solemnity, Three hundred and sixty-three chieftains, wearing the golden torques; [113a] Of those who hurried forth after the excess of revelling, But three escaped by valour from the funeral fosse, [113b] The two war-dogs [114a] of Aeron, and Cynon the dauntless, [114b] And myself, from the spilling of blood, the reward of my candid song. [114c] XXII. My friend in real distress, we should have been by none disturbed, Had not the white-bannered commander [115a] led forth his army; We should not [115b] have been separated in the hall from the banquet of mead, Had he not laid waste our convenient groves; [115c] He crept into the martial field, he crept into our families. [115d] The Gododin relates how that, after the fight in the fosse, When we had no dwellings, [116a] none were more destitute. [116b] XXIII. Scattered, broken, motionless is the weapon, [116c] That used to penetrate through the great horde, [116d] the numerous [117a] horde of the Lloegrians. [117b] Shields were strewn on the sea coast, [117c] shields in the battle of lances; Men were reduced to ashes, [117d] And women rendered widows, Before his death. [117e] O Graid, son of Hoewgi, [117f] With thy spears Didst thou cause an effusion of blood. XXIV. There was the hero, with both his shoulders covered, [118a] By a variegated shield, and possessing the swiftness of a warlike steed; There was a noise in the mount of slaughter, [118b] there was fire, [118c] Impetuous were the lances, there was a sunny gleam, [118d] There was food for ravens, the raven there did triumph, [118e] And before he would let them go free, With the morning dew, like the eagle in his glad course, He scattered them on either side, and like a billow overwhelmed them in front. The Bards of the world judge those to be men of valour, Whose counsels are not divulged to slaves. [119a] The spears in the hands of the warriors were causing devastation; And ere was interred under [119b] the swan-white steed, [119c] One who had been energetic in his commands, His gore had thoroughly washed his armour: [119d] Such was Buddvan, [119e] the son of Bleiddvan the Bold. XXV. It were wrong not to record his magnificent feat; He would not leave an open gap, through cowardice; [120a] The benefit of Britain’s minstrels never quitted his court Upon the calends of January; [120b] according to his design, [120c] His land should not be ploughed, though it might become wild; He was a mighty dragon of indignant disposition; A commander in the bloody field, [120d] after the feast of wine,
Was Gwenabwy [121a] the son of Gwên, [121b] in the strife of Cattraeth. XXVI.

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