Introductory Welsh Lecture 8 Notes.txt - \u201cAr deulu brenneych beych barnasswn Dilyw dyn en vyw nys adawsswn.\u201d If I had judged you to be of the tribe

Introductory Welsh Lecture 8 Notes.txt - u201cAr deulu...

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“Ar deulu brenneych beych barnasswn Dilyw dyn en vyw nys adawsswn.” If I had judged you to be of the tribe of Bryneich, Not the phantom of a man would I have left alive; that the people of those countries were not at the time in question on friendly terms with the neighbouring Britons; which circumstance is further apparent from the contemporary testimony of Llywarch Hen, who speaks of Urien as having conquered the land of Bryneich; “Neus gorug o dir Brynaich.” This, it is true, might have a reference to the Saxon tribes, who had succeeded at an early period, in establishing themselves along the coast in that part of the island, yet the disparaging manner in which the grave of Disgyrnin Disgyfedawt, evidently the father of the “three monarchs,” is spoken of in the Englynion y Beddau, inclines us strongly to the belief that it was the Aborigines themselves who were thus guilty of treason to the common weal. “Cigleu don drom dra thywawd, Am vedd Dysgyrnyn Dysgyveddawd, Aches trwm angwres pechawd.” Hear the sullen wave beyond the strand, Round the grave of Dysgyrnyn Dysgyveddawd, Heavy the burning impulse raised by sin. (Myv. Arch. vol. i. p. 78.) [90a] An allusion to the name of our hero’s father, (Bleiddan) and probably to his own standard. [90b] “Neithyawr.” Al. “than go to the altar.” [90c] Al. “elawr” a bier, “than obtained a bier.” He was devoured by the birds of prey ere he could be removed for interment. [90d] Or, “Ere he received his nuptial dowry, his blood streamed down.” [90e] Hyveidd Hir was the son of Bleiddan Sant, of Glamorgan, (the celebrated Lupus.) According to the Triads he was one of the three alien kings, upon whom dominion was conferred for their mighty deeds, and for their praiseworthy and gracious qualities. “Tri eilldeyrn ynys Prydain: Gwrgai vab Gwrien yn y Gogledd, a Chadavael vab Cynvedw yng Ngwynedd, a Hyveidd Hir vab Bleiddan Sant ym Morganwg: sev y rhodded Teyrnedd iddynt am eu campau a’u cynneddvau clodvorion a rhadvorion.” (Triad, 26, third series.) Taliesin, in his Ode to Urien, speaks of Hyveidd in conjunction with Gododin;— “Hyveidd a Gododin a lleu towys.” (Myv. Arch. vol. i. p. 57.) His name also occurs in another poem, by the same Bard, “to Gwallawg ap Lleenawg;”— “Haearnddur a Hyfeidd a Gwallawg Ac Owein Mon Maelgynig ddefawd A wnaw peithwyr gorweiddiawg.” Haearnddur and Hyveidd and Gwallawg, And Owain of Mon, of Maelgynian manner, Would prostrate the ravagers. (Myv. Arch. vol. i. p. 64.)
The epithet “Hir,” (long or tall) applied to Hyveidd, countenances the view of his being conspicuous on account of his size. [91a] Gognaw must have been the son of Botgad. The name, as well as that of the preceding hero, occurs in an Ode which Taliesin addressed to Gwallawg ab Lleenawg. “Gognaw ei brawd digones.” If, however, it be not a proper name in this stanza, it may be rendered either “with laughter and sprightliness,” or “they were a laughing energy.” [91b] Al. “As with blades they dealt mutual blows.” [91c] “A llaw,” a hand; metaphorically power. Al. “a allaw,” who is able. [92a]

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