Introductory Welsh Lecture 7 Notes - XCIV Echo speaks of the formidable[200d and dragon-like[200e weapons And of the fair game[200f which was played

Introductory Welsh Lecture 7 Notes - XCIV Echo speaks...

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XCIV. Echo speaks of the formidable [200d] and dragon-like [200e] weapons, And of the fair game, [200f] which was played in front of the unclaimed course of Gododin. Profusely did he bring a supply [200g] of wine into the tents, for the benefit of the natives, [200h] In the season of the storm, as long as it trickled from the vessels, And the army, a well nourished host, continued to drop in. A splendid troop of warriors, successful against a hundred men, Is led from Dindovydd in Dyvneint. [201a] Before Doleu [201b] in battle, worn out were the shields, and battered the helmets. XCV. He brought ruin upon every fair region, [201c] And a fettering valour he displayed; The front of his shield was pierced; Caso Hir, arrayed in pomp, [201d] Protected Rhuvoniawg. A second time were they wounded, [201e] and crushed By his warlike steeds, and gore-stained were their coffins. [201f] Always immoveable, always liberal of aid, Would be his gallant nobles, when roused to anger. Severe in the conflict, with blades he slaughtered; And agonising news from the war he brought, Which he wove into a hundred songs for the calends of January. Adan [202a] the son of Urvei there did pierce, Adan pierced the haughty boar, Even he who was like Urien, [202b] a maid, and a hero. And as the youth was thus endowed with the properties of a king, Lord of Gwynedd, and of the blood of Cilydd, [202c] he proved our deliverer; Ere the turf was laid upon the face of the generous dead, Wisely did he seek the field, with praise and high sounding fame: The grave of Gorthyn Hir [202d] is seen [202e] from the highlands of Rhuvoniawg. XCVI. On account of the piercing of the skilful and most learned man, [203a] On account of the fair corpse, which fell prostrate upon the ground, Thrice six officers judged the atrocious deed [203b] at the hour of mattins, And Morien lifted up again his ancient lance, And, roaring, stretched out [203c] death Towards the warriors, the Gwyddyl, [203d] and the Prydyn; [203e] Whilst towards the lovely, slender, blood-stained body of Gwen, Sighed Gwenabwy, the only son of Gwen. XCVII. On account of the afflicting [203f] of the skilful and most learned man Grievously and deeply, when he fell prostrate upon the ground, The banner was pompously [204a] unfurled, and borne by a man in the flank; [204b] A tumultuous scene was beheld [204c] in Eiddin, and on the battle field. The grasp of his hand performed deeds of valour Upon the Cynt, [204d] the Gwyddyl, and the Prydyn. He who meddles with the mane of a wolf, without a club In his hand, will have it gorgeously emblazoned on his robe. Fain would I sing,—“would that Morien had not died.” I sigh for Gwenabwy, the son of Gwen. [204e] Footnotes: [0a] Perhaps Cawlwyd is a compound of Caw Clwyd, that is, the Clyde of Caw. [0b] Institutional Triads. [0c] Ibid.
[0d] Myvyrian Archaiology, vol. i. page 60. [0e] Bardic Triads. [0f] Bardic Triads.

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