AP Literary Terms-3.pdf - Literary Terms This list is not meant to be static or stagnant It is merely a starting point for you to use in literary

AP Literary Terms-3.pdf - Literary Terms This list is not...

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Literary Terms This list is not meant to be static or stagnant. It is merely a starting point for you to use in literary analysis, the composition of essays, and exams. It should be added to throughout your study of literature. Allegory- a tale in prose or verse in which the characters, actions, or settings represent abstract ideas or moral qualities Alliteration- the conspicuous repetition of sounds (usually consonants) in a group of words Allusion- a recognizable reference to a person, place, or event in a literary work Analogy-a comparison between two things to show the similarities in them Antagonist- the opposing force in a drama or narrative Aphorism- terse, pointed statement expressing some clever observation in life Apostrophe- a form of personification in which the absent or dead are spoken to as if present and the inanimate as if animate Archetype - the original pattern or model from which all things of the same kind are copied or on which they are based; a model or first form; prototype Aside- a short speech spoken to the audience or in an undertone by a character Assonance- the repetition of vowel sounds in a group of words Ballad- a story told in verse and usually meant to be sung Bildungsroman- a “coming of age” story. Recounts the youthful development of a hero Blank Verse- verse written in unrhymed iambic pentameter Cacophony – “bad sound”; language that is discordant and difficult to pronounce Cadence- the natural rhythm of language. Any writer with any sense of voice has a cadence that distinguishes his or her work Caesura- a break or pause in a line of poetry. If it occurs early in a line, it is referred to as “initial caesura,” if in the middle, it is “medial” and at the end, it is “terminal” Canon – those works generally considered by scholars, critics, and teachers to be the most important to read and study, which collectively constitute the “masterpieces” of literature; traditionally, it consisted of works by male white writers but has been expanding to include female writers/ethnic writers Caricature- in literature, just as in painting, a portrait that ridicules an individual by exaggerating their most prominent features
Carpe diem – “seize the day” – theme which emphasizes life is short, time is fleeting Catharsis – “purgation”; describes the release of the emotions Climax- the decisive point in a narrative or drama; the point of greatest intensity or interest Colloquial – a type of informal diction that reflects casual, conversational language and often includes slang expressions Conceit- very elaborate comparisons between unlikely objects. The metaphysical poets such as John Donne were criticized for “yoking” together outrageous terms Conflict- a struggle between the two opposing forces in literature (Internal and External) Connotation- an emotional meaning of a word rather than its literal meaning, associated significances/feelings that the word implies Consonance- the repetition of similar consonant sounds in a group of words to produce a harmonious effect

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