Values File

S military action overseas as in kuwait fifty years

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Unformatted text preview: suffering, and thus merits recognition as a step toward the achievement of the lofty principles of peace and justice that underlie the United Nations Charter. STATES THAT INSTITUTE HUMAN RIGHTS REGIMES DO NOT GO TO WAR William W. Burke-White, Lecturer in Public and International Affairs and Senior Special Assistant to the Dean at Princeton University, Spring 2004. THE HARVARD HUMAN RIGHTS JOURNAL, 17 Harv. Hum. Rts. J. 249, p. 272-273. Significant improvements in a previously repressive state's human rights policy can signal an intent not to engage in international aggression. For such a signal to be credible the state must clearly do more than release a few political prisoners or offer pro-human rights rhetoric. But institutionalized changes in human rights policies--such as new legislation or constitutional amendments that are actually practiced, genuine limits on police and military power over citizens, or the independence of the judiciary to review the executive's human rights policies--offer credible signals that the state is less likely to engage in international aggression. n120 States of concern can utilize the linkage between human rights and international aggression as a means to send unambiguous signals of the lack of aggressive intent through institutionalized improvements in human rights practices. A foreign policy informed by human rights would closely monitor human rights developments so as to properly read such signals and potentially improve relations with states that institutionalize human rights protections. INTERNATIONAL PROMOTION OF HUMAN RIGHTS PREVENTS ATTACKS ON THE U.S. William W. Burke-White, Lecturer in Public and International Affairs and Senior Special Assistant to the Dean at Princeton University, Spring 2004. THE HARVARD HUMAN RIGHTS JOURNAL, 17 Harv. Hum. Rts. J. 249, p. 249-250. This Article presents a strategic--as opposed to ideological or normative--argument that the promotion of human rights should be given a more prominent place in U.S. foreign policy. It does so by suggesting a correlation between the domestic human rights practices of states and their propensity to engage in aggressive international conduct. Among the chief threats to U.S. national...
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This document was uploaded on 11/20/2013.

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