(SHEG) Japanese Internment.docx - Japanese Internment Timeline 1891 Japanese immigrants arrive on the mainland U.S for work primarily as agricultural

(SHEG) Japanese Internment.docx - Japanese Internment...

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Japanese Internment Timeline 1891 - Japanese immigrants arrive on the mainland U.S. for work primarily as agricultural laborers. 1906 - The San Francisco Board of Education passes a resolution to segregate children of Chinese, Japanese, and Korean ancestry. 1913 - California passes the Alien Land Law, forbidding "all aliens ineligible for citizenship" from owning land. 1924 - Congress passes the Immigration Act of 1924 effectively ending all Japanese immigration to the U.S. November 1941 - Munson Report released (Document B). December 7, 1941 - Japan bombs U.S. ships and planes at the Pearl Harbor military base in Hawaii. February 19, 1942 - President Roosevelt signs Executive Order 9066 authorizing military authorities to exclude civilians from any area without trial or hearing. January 1943 - The War Department announces the formation of a segregated unit of Japanese-American soldiers. January 1944 - The War Department imposes the draft on JapaneseAmerican men, including those incarcerated in the camps. December 1944 - The Supreme Court upholds the constitutionality of Executive Order 9066 in Korematsu v. United States (Document D) . March 20, 1946 - Tule Lake "Segregation Center" closes. This is the last War Relocation Authority facility to close. 1980 - The Commission on Wartime Relocation and Internment of Civilians is established . 1983 - The Commission on Wartime Relocation and Internment of Civilians issues its report, Personal Justice Denied (Document E). August 10, 1988 - President Ronald Reagan signs HR 442 into law. It acknowledges that the incarceration of more than 110,000 individuals of Japanese descent was unjust, and offers an apology and reparation payments of $20,000 to each person incarcerated. Japanese Internment
Document B: The Munson Report There is no Japanese `problem' on the Coast. There will be no armed uprising of Japanese. There will undoubtedly be some sabotage financed by Japan and executed largely by imported agents...In each Naval District there are about 250 to 300 suspects under surveillance. It is easy to get on the suspect list, merely a speech in favor of Japan at some banquet being sufficient to land one there. The Intelligence Services are generous with the title of suspect and are taking no chances. Privately, they believe that only 50 or 60 in each district can be classed as really dangerous. The Japanese are hampered as saboteurs because of their easily recognized physical appearance. It will be hard for them to get near anything to blow up if it is guarded.

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