The_13th_Documentary_-_Angelica_Marquez - Angelica Marquez...

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Angelica Marquez POSC 100C Professor Gloria Badal 2020 November 17 Film Response The 13th film, written by Ava Duvernay, based on the Thirteenth Amendment, investigates the nexus of race, justice and mass incarnation in the United States. The 13th amendment officially abolished slavery, but the Fillm speaks of the exemption clause of the amendments. Slavery is unlawful except as a penalty for a crime. The documentary by Duvernay gives viewers a convincing look into how the current culture of prison and labour contributes to slavery and the Black Live struggle is framed. The 13th amendment specifies that you are innocent until you are criminalized. And it doesn't relate to you if you're thrown in prison. For all but criminals, slavery was abolished. Duvernay demonstrated how slavery was enforced by means of axes such as criminalizing conduct and encouraging the police to prosecute the poor, free men in activities after the conclusion of the American Civil War. African Americans had to work for the state because things were too easy as loitering and then in jail. The 13th considers a mass detention in the penal system a hostile response to movements for human rights. The prison system is still ethnic and abusive, but it is changing constantly. From the 1940s onwards there was a gradual but steep growth in the number of inmates. During the civil rights movement, a surge in figures started and is still continuing today. The higher our agitation for justice, the harder the democratic establishment fails. They're doing everything they can about detention to intimidate blacks.
Electively, the 13th reveals that violence continues to escalate and that bias remains persistent.

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