CORINTHIANS.docx - Jack Nevins Dr Chancey New Testament 12...

  • KCA University
  • LAW 1
  • DeaconHummingbird991
  • 7
  • 100% (1) 1 out of 1 people found this document helpful

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 7 pages.

Jack Nevins Dr. Chancey New Testament 12 October 2020 Controversies in the Corinthians' Worship Practices There were a lot of controversies during the extensive Corinthian correspondenceswith Paul. In Paul's letters in the New Testament, Paul addresses the various problems occurring in his churches. These issues included several issues affecting the Corinthians as community believers such as divisiveness litigation, food offered to idols, and class divisions of the communal meal. One constant theme represented in his writing is that God's salvation for the common folk's sins through Jesus Christ is soon to pass; this is prevalent in 1 Corinthians concerning their worship practices. Paul states thatthis letteris to reprimand the Corinthians as beloved children. They are expected tofollow Christ's work exactly as Paulteachesin all his churches. Generally speaking, Paulhopes to erasethe liturgical problems in 1 Corinthians and unify the people as one body under Christ by highlighting the unparalleled and hardly image of the first church in the Corinth.The first church in Corinth included the Jews, and relatively the church was composed of more gentile converts. In 1 Corinthians chapter eleven, verse 26, he denotes that the first church in Corinth was composed of humble congregants; This implies that some congregants in the church were wise and powerful than others .some even were
regarded to have a noble birth; This brought social stratifications in the church since somemembers were more privileged than others.One of the most infamous problems demonstrated in the community is discrimination against women. The first Corinthian church was a mixed-gender group. In 1 Corinthians 11, Paul gathers the Corinthians and tells them how to conduct themselves during worship. Paul specifically addresses the female head covering and how it affects their rights to address the assembly. "Any man who prays or prophesies with something on his head disgraces his head, but any woman who prays or prophesies with her head unveiled disgraces her head" (1 Corinthians 11:4-5). Paul indicates in his day, Jewish males were not allowed to wear any special head covering during worship, whereas the woman was forced to wear headgears. During worship, neither man nor woman was able to gather themselves with similar physical appearances publicly. This practice does not

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture