lecture 3 - 1 Lecture 3 Reading: chapter 2 section 8 and...

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Unformatted text preview: 1 Lecture 3 Reading: chapter 2 section 8 and chapter 3 section 1 Homework 2: chapter 2: 18, 20, 24, 38, 42, 44, 46, 48, 50, 52, 54, 56, 60, 62, 64, 66, 68 Due: Thursday, Oct. 4 Ionic compounds are composed of oppositely charged ions held together by electrostatic attraction. Ionic Compounds Examples Na + + Cl- NaCl Zn 2+ + S 2- ZnS Ca 2+ + F- CaF 2 Al 3+ + O 2- Al 2 O 3 K + + SO 4 2- K 2 SO 4 NH 4 + + S 2- (NH 4 ) 2 S The total negative charge must be equal to the total positive charge. This allows us to accurately predict the ratios of each type of ion in a binary ionic compound. 2 Naming Inorganic Compounds Ionic compounds Naming of cations: Cations have the same name as the metal. Example: Na + = sodium ion. If the metal can have more than one possible charge, then the charge is indicated by a Roman numeral in parentheses following the metal name. Examples: Cu + = copper(I); Cu 2+ = copper(II). Cations formed from non-metals end in - ium . Example: NH 4 + ammonium ion; H 3 O + hydronium ion. 3 Naming of Anions Monatomic anions (with only one atom) are called -ide. Example: Cl- is chloride ion. Polyatomic anions end in -ide: hydroxide (OH- ), cyanide (CN- ), peroxide (O 2 2- ). Oxyanions: polyatomic anions containing oxygen....
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course CHEM 121 taught by Professor Wyzlouzil during the Fall '07 term at Ohio State.

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lecture 3 - 1 Lecture 3 Reading: chapter 2 section 8 and...

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