Appositives - Appositives An appositive renames or explains...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Appositives An appositive renames or explains a noun or a pronoun in the sentence. Usually appositives come immediately after the noun or pronoun they modify. Because they interrupt a sentence, appositives should be set off by commas. Mrs. Gregson, our math teacher, lived in Minnesota. If an appositive comes at the end of a sentence, the appositive only requires one comma. Have you ever been to Hartford, the capital of Connecticut? Commas are not used if an appositive identifies a person or thing by telling which one or ones. Usually these appositives are names. In cases where leaving out the appositive would make the meaning of the noun too vague, no comma is needed. My brother Elroy has his own apartment. [The appositive is Elroy] The popular US President John F. Kennedy was known for his eloquent speeches. [Without JFK, the main noun (The popular US President) would be too vague. The president’s name is essential for understanding the sentence] If the sentences above would be turned around commas would be needed. Elroy, my brother, has his own apartment. [Elroy is pretty specific]
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/08/2008 for the course HIST 1432 taught by Professor Kane during the Spring '08 term at Pittsburgh.

Page1 / 2

Appositives - Appositives An appositive renames or explains...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online