Hubbard Brook Study

Hubbard Brook Study - Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest...

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Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (HBEF) was established in 1955 as a major center for hydrologic research in New England. The site is located within the boundaries of the White Mountain National Forest in central New Hampshire. The 3,138- ha, bowl- shaped Valley has hilly terrain, ranging from 222 to 1,015 m altitude. During the first eight years following establishment a network of precipitation and stream-gauging stations, weather instrumentation, as well as soil and vegetation monitoring sites on small experimental watersheds were developed. Data from these installations combined with several initial studies formed the hydrometeorologic foundation for much of the future research at the HBEF. The major emphasis in these early studies was to determine the impact of forest land management on water yield and quality, and flood flow.
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The Hubbard Brook Ecosystem Study (HBES) originated in 1960 with the idea of the small watershed approach to study element flux and cycling. A joint research program between the USDA Forest Service and Dartmouth College was established by a cooperative agreement in 1963. Also that year, funds from a grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) provided the start of the HBES research program. Support from the USDA Forest Service and the NSF has been continuous since that time. In 1988 the HBEF was designated as a Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) site by the National Science Foundation. On-going cooperative efforts among diverse educational institutions, private institutions, government agencies, foundations and corporations have resulted in one of the most extensive and longest continuous data bases on the hydrology, biology, geology and chemistry of natural ecosystems. Climate
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Annual precipitation averages about 1,400 mm, with one-third to one-quarter as snow. Approximately 111 separate storms occur each year. A snowpack usually persists from mid-December until mid-April, with a peak depth in March of about 1,020 to 1,270 mm, having about 250 to 300 mm of water content. January averages about –9oC, and long periods of low temperatures from –12oC to – 180C are common. The average July temperature is 18oC. The average number of days without killing frost is 145; however, the growing season for trees is considered to be from 15 May to 15 September. The estimated annual evapotranspiration is about 500 mm. Soils
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Hubbard Brook Study - Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest...

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