Week 1-Narrative-Layer Cake

Week 1-Narrative-Layer Cake - Adapting source material from...

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Adapting source material from one medium to another causes many changes within a story, particularly by leaving out smaller storylines (satellites), dropping minor characters, or even combining characters. The most common adaptation is making a book a movie. Books and movies both have their good and bad qualities. Books allow you to drop right into the main characters mind, you know what they’re thinking as everything happens, and books can also spell out what other characters are thinking or feeling. Movies do this as well, but in different ways. Music, setting, and subtle body language is used to portray emotions and thoughts; narrative is also used, though it’s not as common. Conversely, movies can show things books cannot. Book must take time to explain what a character looks like, or to describe a setting, which can take the reader out of the moment and disrupt the flow of the story. Movies, being visual, just show characters and action without being expository. The largest recent book to cinema adaptation
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This note was uploaded on 04/08/2008 for the course THFM 161 taught by Professor Staff during the Summer '07 term at Bowling Green.

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Week 1-Narrative-Layer Cake - Adapting source material from...

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