But these scenarios also envision the use of more

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Unformatted text preview: t; in fact, the greatest threat imaginable. But viewing climate change as an environmental problem fails to do justice to the magnitude of the peril it poses. As Reid’s speech and the 2003 Pentagon study make clear, the greatest danger posed by global climate change is not the degradation of ecosystems per se, but rather the disintegration of entire human societies, producing wholesale starvation, mass migrations and recurring conflict over resources. “As famine, disease, and weather-related disasters strike due to abrupt climate change,” the Pentagon report notes, “many countries’ needs will exceed their carrying capacity”—that is, their ability to provide the minimum requirements for human survival. This “will create a sense of desperation, which is likely to lead to offensive aggression” against countries with a greater stock of vital resources. “Imagine eastern European countries, struggling to feed their populations with a falling supply of food, water, and energy, eyeing Russia, whose population is already in decline, for access to its grain, min...
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This note was uploaded on 11/30/2013 for the course PHILOSOPHY 303m taught by Professor Tye during the Fall '12 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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