Scholars and statesmen have long recognized the

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: ership to pursue their own visions of regional political and economic orders. Free markets would become more politicised — and, well, less free — and major powers would compete for supremacy.Additionally, such power plays have historically possessed a zero-sum element. In the late 1960s and 1970s, US economic power declined relative to the rise of the Japanese and Western European economies, with the US dollar also becoming less attractive. And, as American power eroded, so did international regimes (such as the Bretton Woods System in 1973).A world without American hegemony is one where great power wars re-emerge, the liberal international system is supplanted by an authoritarian one, and trade protectionism devolves into restrictive, anti-globalisation barriers . This, at least, is one possibility we can forecast in a future that will inevitably be devoid of unrivalled US primacy. Primacy is key to maintain economic growth, human rights, trade channels, democracy, and prevent natural disaster crises, terrorism, and great power wars Bradley A. Thayer, November/December, 2006 “In Defense of Primacy,” NATIONAL INTEREST Issue 86 THR...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 11/30/2013 for the course PHILOSOPHY 303m taught by Professor Tye during the Fall '12 term at University of Texas at Austin.

Ask a homework question - tutors are online