SecondPaperEthicalEgoism

SecondPaperEthicalEgoism - PHIL 1100 Ethical Egoism A...

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PHIL 1100 Ethical Egoism: A Flawed Moral Theory In this paper I will argue that Ethical Egoism fails as an adequate moral theory. First, I will explain the claims and misconceptions of the theory. Then I will explain the arguments in support of the theory and how opponents of the theory would respond. Thirdly, I will explain the arguments that oppose the theory and how proponents of Ethical Egoism would respond. Finally, I will reject Ethical Egoism as an adequate moral theory on the basis that it permits us to violate the Principle of Equitable Treatment and to violate the rights of others. The main claim of Ethical Egoism is that we should act in our own self-interests at all times. Ethical Egoism states that an act is morally right if no other act would produce more net intrinsic good for the agent. Conversely, an act is morally obligatory if and only if it would produce more net intrinsic good for the agent than any other act. An act is considered to be morally obligatory, if it would produce more net intrinsic good for the agent than any other alternative. An obligatory act is one that if you did not do the act, you would be doing wrong. The agent is the person committing the act. For an act to be intrinsically good, it must be good for its own sake. For an act to intrinsically evil, it must be evil for its own sake. This differs from extrinsically good and evil acts. An act is extrinsically good because it produces more intrinsic good than intrinsic evil. An act is extrinsically evil if it produces more intrinsic evil than intrinsic good. Now, I will discuss the two arguments in support of Ethical Egoism along with the response one would expect from an opponent of the theory. The first is the “Why Be
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PHIL 1100 Moral” argument and the second is the Psychological Egoist’s defense of Ethical Egoism. The “Why Be Moral “ argument supports Ethical Egoism. The first claim is that every adequate ethical theory must say why one should be moral. According to Ethical Egoism, being moral is in one’s self-interest. It is in one’s self-interest because of the good feeling one gets from doing a moral action or not having to feel the guilt of not doing the moral action. The Psychological Egoist also provides a defense of Ethical Egoism. The
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SecondPaperEthicalEgoism - PHIL 1100 Ethical Egoism A...

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