Religious_Music_in_the_Renaissance

Religious_Music_in_the_Renaissance - Religious Music in the...

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Religious Music in the Renaissance (Printing press, 1493) Most women in religious societies were very active with the general public as well- many nuns were music teachers to young girls (particularly in Italy) 1563- 1/3 of Italy’s girls were in convents, by 1650 over ¾’s of Milanese aristocracy were in convents! Council of Trent- met in response to the Protestant Reformation; it also cloistered nuns and significantly restricted their contact with the “outside world” Many convents were known for their music, and was a source of pride in the town- eventually the nuns performed their services in an inner chapel, outside of public view but not hearing! Nuns of San Vito, Ferrara Directed by Rafaella Aleotti- (see secular music section) They played instrumental concerts as well as vocal performances Rivaled the “Concerto delle donne” with their skills They played all instruments, not just “women’s instruments” eg-trumpet (cornetti) and trombone They also studied secular music-
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Religious_Music_in_the_Renaissance - Religious Music in the...

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