convection1a - Thermo and Heat Transfer Lab Project Report...

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Thermo and Heat Transfer Lab: Project Report For The Natural Convection and Radiation Heat Transfer from a Circular Cylinder Experiment Performed: February 6th, 2008 Team #2: Mike Coover David Cunningham Mark Merritt Bill Mann Doug Diemel Submitted To: Dr. William Danley 1
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Objective : The objective of this report is to summarize the results from the data compiled during the execution of the natural convection and radiation heat transfer from a circular cylinder experiment. This goal of the experiment was to observe and document the mode of natural convection and radiant heat transfer from an electrically heated cylinder. The values obtained were compared to existing heat transfer correlations. This experiment demonstrated that heat transfer from a heated surface to a dormant environment is a combination of heat loss due to natural convection and radiation. As detailed in this report, relative magnitudes of natural convection and radiation heat transfer coefficients depend on the surface temperature with radiation becoming more important as the surface temperature increases. Theory: Convection in general terms refers to the movement of currents within fluids (gases) and is one of the major modes of heat transfer. In fluids, convective heat transfer takes place through diffusion and advection. If a surface is at a temperature above its surroundings and is located in stationary air, heat will be transferred from the surface to the surroundings. In one type of heat convection, the heat may be carried passively by fluid motion which would occur regardless of the heating process (a heat transfer process termed ‘forced convection’). 2
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In forced heat convection, transfer of heat and movement in the fluid is a result from other forces, such as a fan or pump. A convection oven thus works by forced convection, as a fan rapidly circulates hot air forcing heat into food faster. Common fluid heat- radiator systems are also examples of forced convection.
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