Lecture22009 - Non-Point Source Air Microlayer Ground water...

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Sink Source Benthic Epi-benthic Water Bedrock Air Sediments Point Source Non-Point Source Ground water Hyporheic zones Biota Microlayer Chemical Fate
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Sink Source Benthic Epi-benthic Surficial Sediment s Sediment Water Bedrock Bedrock inorganic organic Chironomid larvae pore water
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C C Cl Cl Cl H Cl Cl D ichloro d iphenyl t richloroethane
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DDT DDT was banned for sale in the U.S. on January 1, 1973 In 1993, DDT was the third most frequently detected pesticide on produce entering the U.S. Prior to its being banned DDT was accumulating in the fat of humans and all other animals including Arctic seals, and Antarctic penguins even though these animals were far removed from any point of application. Further study showed that birds were acquiring high levels of DDT by biomagnification
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DDT was classified as a suspected occupational carcinogen that should be handled cautiously in the workplace. Statistically significant correlation between high body burdens of DDT and breast cancer were observed. ( Correlation does not establish cause and effect, There is a significant correlation between the number of Baptist ministers in a City and liquor consumption .) At a site in California people found DDT the size of bowling balls under houses surrounding the site that was abandoned by a chemical company still in business. EPA bought the homes. Sewers leading to the ocean so contaminated they are being cleaned by hand. Hazmat suits and buckets.
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The California site is a superfund site (Superfund is the federal government’s program to clean up the nation’s uncontrolled hazardous waste sites) and its history is all to reminiscent of other sites around the country. The Palos Verdes Shelf Superfund site is an area of contaminated sediment off the Palos Verde Peninsula. The contaminated sediment lies in the Pacific Ocean at depths of 50 ft. or more, too deep for human contact. However, the fish found in the Palos Verdes Shelf area contain high concentrations of DDT and PCBs, concentrations that continue to pose a threat to human health and the natural environment. The U.S. Justice Department and the California Attorney General in 1990 filed suit under the federal Superfund Law, alleging that Montrose Chemical Corporation of California, Aventis CropScience USA, Inc., Chris-Craft Industries Inc. and Atkemix Thirty Seven Inc., either owned or operated a DDT manufacturing plant in Los Angeles County.
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Montrose Chemical Corp. Was the nation’s largest manufacturer of DDT. From the 1950s to the 1971 tons of DDT were dumped into the sewer system. In 1971, the last year Montrose used the county sewers, an estimated 50,500 lbs. The settlement ( 2000 ) brought the total amount for environmental restoration to $137.5 million. The US and California previously reached similar settlements with County Sanitation District No. 2 of LA which operated the sewers that conveyed the DDT to the ocean; about 150 municipalities that discharged other substances through the sewers; and three other
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