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3dfx Interactive From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to navigationJump to search This article has multiple issues. Please help improve it or discuss these issues on the talk page. (Learn how and when to remove these template messages) This article possibly contains original research. (January 2012) This article needs additional citations for verification. (May 2008) This article may require cleanup to meet Wikipedia's quality standards. The specific problem is: History is quite messy and arranged incorrectly, among many other issues. (September 2019) 3dfx Interactive 3dfx logo.jpg Industry Semiconductors Successor Nvidia Founded August 24, 1994; 26 years ago[1] Defunct 2002; 19 years ago[2] Fate Bankrupt,[2] most assets bought by Nvidia, fate of remaining assets unknown. Headquarters San Jose, California, USA Key people Ross Smith, Scott Sellers, Gary Tarolli Products Voodoo Graphics Series Website 3dfx.com at the Wayback Machine (archived February 1, 2001) 3dfx Interactive was a company headquartered in San Jose, California, founded in 1994, that specialized in the manufacturing of 3D graphics processing units, and later, graphics cards. It was a pioneer in the field from the late 1990s until 2000. The company's original product was the Voodoo Graphics, an add-in card that implemented hardware acceleration of 3D graphics. The hardware accelerated only 3D rendering, relying on the PC's current video card for 2D support. Despite this limitation, the Voodoo Graphics product and its follow-up, Voodoo2, were popular. It became standard for 3D games to offer support for the company's Glide API. The success of the company's products led to renewed interest in 3D gaming, and by the second half of the 1990s, products combining a 2D output with reasonable 3D performance were appearing. This was accelerated by the introduction of Microsoft's Direct3D, which provided a single high-performance API that could be implemented on these cards, seriously eroding the value of Glide. While 3Dfx continued to offer high-performance options, the value proposition was no longer compelling. 3dfx rapidly declined in the late 1990s and was acquired by Nvidia on December 15, 2000,[3] mostly for intellectual property rights. The acquisition was accounted for as a purchase by Nvidia and was completed by the first quarter of their fiscal year of 2002. 3dfx ceased supporting their products on February 15, 2001. Contents 1 History 1.1 Early history 1.2 Voodoo Graphics PCI 1.3 Voodoo Rush 1.4 Voodoo2 1.5 Banshee 1.6 Rampage 1.7 Dreamcast 1.8 Voodoo3 and strategy shift 1.9 Voodoo 4 and 5 1.10 Acquisition and bankruptcy 2 Products
3 References 4 External links History Early history Founded on August 24, 1994 as 3D/fx, Inc.[1] by Ross Smith, Gary Tarolli and Scott Sellers (all former employees of Silicon Graphics Inc.) with backing from Gordie Campbell's TechFarm, 3dfx released its Voodoo Graphics chip on October 7, 1996, with the Orchid Righteous 3D being the first model to launch with the chipset.[4] The company manufactured only the chips and some reference boards,

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