Nietzsche's On the Genealogy of Morality - POLI 240 11\/13 Nietzsches On the Genealogy of Morality What Does It Mean That It is All a Dream Plato To

Nietzsche's On the Genealogy of Morality - POLI 240 11/13...

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POLI 240 11/13 Nietzsche’s On the Genealogy of Morality What Does It Mean That It is All a Dream? Plato - To dream is to live non-philosophically - The dream is misleading & therefore dangerous - Plato as a poet o His dream is less misleading & therefore not as dangerous o HOWEVER, the whole edifice is itself a dream, & not to be taken as the “thing itself” - To live philosophically is to be aware that one is dreaming Nietzsche the Iconoclast (1844-1900) - Trained as a philologist - Writing after Kant, Hegel & Marx & responding to them - Targets Socrates (Plato) as well - Nietzsche is opposed to what he sees as the anti-life tendencies of key figures of western thought - “The belly is the reason man does not so easily take himself for a god” – Nietzsche, Beyond Good & Evil , aphorism #141 Being vs. Becoming - From Plato onwards, the emphasis of Western philosophers has been on discovering or uncovering Being o Fixed, unchangeable, permanent, universal o “That which is does not become, that which becomes is not” (Plato) - Nietzsche rails against this, stressing instead the centrality of Becoming - This is in many ways a return to the pre-Socratic views of the likes of Heraclitus o “All is fire” - Appearance or dreams reality - “For all the most intense life of this dream reality, we nevertheless have the thoroughly unpleasant sense of their illusory quality : that, at least, is my experience. For the frequency, indeed normality, of this response, I could point to many witnesses & the utterances of poets. Even the philosophical man has the presentiment that under this reality in which we live & have our being lies a second, totally different reality & that thus the former is an allusion” - “Now, just as the philosopher behaves in relation to the reality of existence, so the artistically excitable man behaves in relation to the reality of dreams: he looks at them precisely & with pleasure, for from these pictures he fashions his interpretation of life; from these events he rehearses his life… & perhaps several people remember, like me, amid the dangers & terrors of a dream, successfully cheering themselves up by shouting: “It is a dream! I want to dream it some more!”… These facts are clear 1
POLI 240 11/13 evidence showing that our innermost beings, the secret underground in all of us, experiences its dreams with deep enjoyment & a sense of delightful necessity” Are Dreams True or False?

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