Tree of Life summary

Tree of Life summary - developed extensive technology which...

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Sara Carlson February 26, 2007 BIOS120 – 113 Lucy’s Baby Summary: This article is about the discovery of Selam, the fossil of a three year old girl who lived 3.3 million years ago. She is the earliest child in the human fossil record and she was found in Ethiopia. Selam is a member of the A. afarensis species, and her bone structure raises many questions about how humans evolved to be bipedal and the order of which other body parts changed over the years. The major question of this article is whether the A. afarensis was a tree- dweller or a ground inhabiting species. Because Selam showed many apelike features as well as distinctly human features, she shows a branching point of evolution. In our class discussion we focused mainly on the topic of evolution. The definition of evolution is changes in the gene frequencies of a population over time. We discussed human evolution and how the current generation could be stunting our own evolution by passing on harmful genes, such as the breast cancer BRCA genes. We are now living longer and have
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Unformatted text preview: developed extensive technology which has several affects on our species. Were currently increasing the human life span, but also depleting our natural resources. We questioned how human evolution will take place in our current environment and came to the conclusion that nature will take its course. We may be developing ways to cure many diseases and fight cancers, but nature is unpredictable and uncontrollable. We can see this in the AIDS virus, for example, because this virus mutates frequently and is presently incurable. To relate this back to the article, the A. afarensis species were a product of a change in gene frequencies and it exhibits mosaic evolution. The sequence of changes is not yet determined, but the hominin may have developed the pelvis for bipedalism before the arms and shoulders evolved, which explains why Selam looks like a tree-dweller as well as a biped....
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This note was uploaded on 04/08/2008 for the course BIOS 120 taught by Professor Cundall during the Fall '06 term at Lehigh University .

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