Aristotle Class Notes

Chpt9howyoucanacquirevirtue sotosumyouneed i

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 ‐ he
does
not
say
that
possessing
virtue
is
happiness,
his
view
is
more
complicated
than
 that
 ‐ virtue
is
a
sort
of
state
of
character.
Its
not
enough
to
simply
possess
virtuous
traits
of
 character
in
order
to
posses/achieve
happiness
 1099
a
v
–

roughly
“Olympic
prizes
are
not
for
the
strongest
and
finest.
But
only
for
the
 contestants.
“

 just
possessing
admirable
qualities
is
not
enough
for
getting
the
prize,
you
must
exercise
 (express
them
in
action)
these
virtues
in
order
to
get
the
“prize”
 possession
does
notequal
happiness;
possession,
action
and
exercise
these
human
qualities
 =
happiness
 feelings
can
be
independent
of
what
you
actually
do
–
thus
an
approach
of
this
kind
sends
us
 down
the
wrong
path
 now,
the
best
way
to
study
happiness
is
to
study
virtue,
but
this
does
NOT
MEAN
that
they
 are
the
same,
if
you
mean
simply
possessing
virtue
 
 In
order
to
study
virtue
we
need
to
start
by
examining
the
human
character
/activities

 A.2.
 
From
among
human
activities,
we
can
identify
some

(“parts
of
the
soul”)
as:
 ‐ arational
–
do
not
involve
reason
(nutrition,
growth)
 ‐ rational

‐
this
‘part
of
the
soul’
is
in
itself
complex,
possessing
two
parts.

 

 ‐
One
of
which
is
the
thinking/reasoning
part
–
this
is
the
part
that
ACTUALLY
 engages
in
thinking
and
reason
–
math,
philosophy
etc.

 

 ‐
Desires
and
feelings
are
also
categorized
in
the
rational
section,
which
may
 seem
illogical
at
first
as
they
are
not
inherently
rational.
So
why
did
he
choose
this?

 Nutrition/growth
are
impervious
to
rational
thought,
while
desires
and
feelings
are
 susceptible
to
being
guided
by
or
influenced
by
rational
thought.
While
they
themselves
 do
not
possess
reason,
they
will
‘listen’
to
reason.

They
partake
in
reason
due
to
the
 fact
that
they
are
influenced
by
reason
 
 While
virtue
is
not
excellence
in
all
activities,
it
does
in
rational
activities
(according
to
 Aristotle)

 There
are
two
different
type
of
intellect
 ‐ virtues
of
thought
–
excellence
in
thinking
and
reasoning

(which
are
themselves
 diverse,
having
many
different
sub‐t...
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This note was uploaded on 12/27/2013 for the course PHIL 230 taught by Professor Stroud during the Fall '07 term at McGill.

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