Aristotle Class Notes

Itrequiresaproperbalanceorrealismandidealismin

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Unformatted text preview: fe
to
be
activity
and
 actions...
that
involve
reason”
(1098a14)
 Human
function
must
be
distinctive
 The
function
argument
gives
us
an
additional
reason
as
to
why
we
cannot
identify
the
 highest
good
with
pleasure,
because
it
is
not
our
distinctive
nature
or
essence
 
‐
Function
and
the
good:
the
good
for
an
F:

 excellence
in
performing
the
characteristic
activity
(or
function)
of
Fs
the
function
of
an
F:

 •
the
characteristic
activity
of
Fs

 •
the
distinctive
nature
or
essence
of
Fs
the
human
function:

 “we
take
the
human
function
to
be
a
certain
kind
of
life,
and
take
this
life
to
be
activity
and
 actions
...
that
involve
reason”

 (1098a14,
emphasis
added)

 so
we
can
identify
the
human
good
(the
good
for
a
human
being)
as
excellence
in

“activity
 and
actions
that
involve
reason,”

i.e.,
as
excellence
in
rational
activity.
 
 September
16,
2009
 
 4Review
 Highest
good
–
the
human
eregon,
the
thing
distinctive
to
humans
–
Reason
–

 Highest
good
=
Actions
in
excellence
and

 The
good
for
the
human
being
is
excellence
in
this
eregon

excellence
in
rational
activity
‐
 
 A. transition
to
the
account
of
virtue
 1. virtue
and
happiness
(i
8)
 2. two
kinds
of
virtue
(i
13)
 B. virtues
of
character
(ii,
iii
10‐12,
x
9)
 1. their
acquisition

 2. their
nature:
the
doctrine
of
the
mean
 3. one
example:
temperance
(iii
10
‐12)
 C. decision,
deliberation,
prudence
(selections
from
iii,
vi)
 1. two
kinds
of
thought

(vi
1‐2)
 2. decision
and
good
deliberation
(iii
2‐3,
vi
8‐9)
 3. prudence
(rest
of
vi)
 
 
excellence
in
rational
activity

human
good
 (some
things
are
excluded
here,
ie
digestion.
But
what
IS
included?)
 ἀρετή
‐ aretë
=
excellence
–
in
activities
involving
reason
 










=
virtue
 
 A.1.
 Aristotle
introduces
the
idea
of
virtue
as
the
one

 ‐ happiness
relates
to
virtue,
and
thus
we
must
study
virtue
 book
1,
chpt
8
–
decides
that
happiness
and
virtue
(
a
certain
kind
of
excellence,
in
a
certain
 kind
of
activity)
are
intimately
relat...
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This note was uploaded on 12/27/2013 for the course PHIL 230 taught by Professor Stroud during the Fall '07 term at McGill.

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