Aristotle Class Notes

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Unformatted text preview: further
than
the
idea
that
all
human
actions
have
an
end
a
 single
goal,
(similarly
saying
everyone
has
a
mother,
does
not
mean
everyone
has
the
same
 mother)
we
need
to
be
persuaded
that
all
actions
strive
for
the
same
end
 Reading
Aristotle/
hanging
out
with
friends
seem
to
have
different
ends
–
ie
a
multiplicity
of
 ends,
a
diversity
of
ends
 Aristotle
must
prove
to
us
that
there
is
a
single
end

 (1094a7)
admits
bridlemaking
makes
a
good
bridle,
woodworking
makes
a
good
cabinet
 how
does
he
reconcile
these
two
ideas?
 He
draws
a
distinction

(philosophers
differentiate
things)
between
types
of
 activities/ends?
in
order
to
reconcile
the
idea
of
multiple
ends
with

the
highest
goal
 
 So:

 The
end
of
an
activity
 ‐ the
goal,
aim,
or
point
of
the
activity
 ‐ the
good
which
you
seek
to
obtain
by
engaging
in
the
activity
 (what
does
Aristotle
mean
by
end?)
 ‐ 
“that
for
the
sake
of
which
[the
activity]
is
done”
(1097a19)
***
 
 we
can
differentiate
different
kinds
of
ends
 ‐ things
that
you
want
/value/pursue/care
about/engage
in
for
the
sake
of
something
 else
 ie
working
at
superstore,
not
for
working
itself,
but
for
money
 we
call
this
instrumental
goods
–
because
they
are
instruments
to
get
something
else,

 
 things
that
you
want
/value/pursue/care
about/engage
in
for
their
own
sake
 difficult
to
come
up
with
uncontroversial
examples
(ie
playing
sports
for
its
own
sake?
Or
 for
exercise?
)
‐

exercise,
pleasure/enjoyment,
relationships,
health,
music
 these
are
called
intrinsic
goods
 
 ‐ what
about
if
I
play
sports
because
it
gives
me
pleasure
and
enjoyment?
Does
that
 make
it
in
instrumental
good?
 ‐ Things
can
be
both
intrinsic
and
instrumental
goods
(playing
golf
because
you
like
it,
 and
because
it
benefits
work
relations)

 
 Instrumental
goods
are
such
–
because
they
are
instruments
to
get
something
else,
BUT
 these
somethings
must
be
an
intrinsic
good

 THUS
we
can
create
a
hierarchy
of
goods
such
that
each
instrumental
good
(X)
points
to
a
 intrinsic
good
(Y)
–
Y
is
higher
than
X
 
 Lets
look
at
his
example
 Bridle
making

to
produce
a
(good)
bridle

for
the
sake
of
horsemanship

military
 prowess

protection
of
the
citizens...
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This note was uploaded on 12/27/2013 for the course PHIL 230 taught by Professor Stroud during the Fall '07 term at McGill.

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