2011 ap world history syllabus - AP WORLD HISTORY Advanced...

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AP WORLD HISTORY Advanced Placement World History is a college level course from which students may earn up to eight college credits upon successful completion of the Advanced Placement World History Exam produced by the College Board. This course begins with Pre-History and extends into the present day world. Much of the course content deals with various major historical strands or themes throughout the history of the world, such as the change over time through the major religions, the various regional and demographic developments, and the chronological cultural representations around the global. Continuity and Change will be addressed throughout the various themes of each unit and the course involves comprehensive analysis of both primary and secondary texts and places a great emphasis on historical research and writing. Comparison within and among societies, including societal and global processes, will be addressed throughout each unit in the form of historical essay writing . Much of the focus will be placed on the five major themes that include: Interaction between humans and the environment, Development and interaction of cultures, State-building, expansion, and conflict, Creation, expansion, and interaction of economic systems, and Development and transformation of social structures. Theme 1: Interaction Between Humans and the Environment Theme 2: Development and Interaction of Cultures Theme 3: State-Building, Expansion, and Conflict Theme 4: Creation, Expansion, and Interaction of Economic Systems Theme 5: Development and Transformation of Social Structures These five course themes will serve as the foundation and framework for this course and for all student activities. Resources Primary Sources Text: Bentley, Jerry H, and Herbert F Ziegler. Traditions & Encounters: A global Perspective on the Past 4th ed . New York: McGraw-Hill, 2008. Print. Quantitative Tables and graphs will be taken from the textbook, readers, and internet sources for the most part. See the course outline for specific examples. Visual Most images for analysis will originate from the textbook, readers and the internet. Examples include but are not limited to art, political cartoons, and photographs; see the course outline below for specific examples.
Secondary Sources Adams, Paul Vauthier, Erick Langer, Lily Hwa, Peter Stearns, and Wiesner-Hanks Merry. Experiencing World History . New York: New York University Press, 2000. Print. Bernstein, William J.. A splendid exchange: how trade shaped the world . New York: Atlantic Monthly Press, 2008. Print. Burbank, Jane, and Frederick Cooper. Empires In World History . Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2010. Christian, David. This fleeting world: a short history of humanity . Great Barrington, Mass.: Berkshire Pub., 2008. Print.

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