CS 103 S2 Highlights

CS 103 S2 Highlights - In-class notes for CS 103, Updated...

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In-class notes for CS 103, Updated 2006-01-31, 11:55am These are highlights from the lectures in CS 103. You can use them to help you remember what was said. You can also add your own additional notes and comments to them. Each day starts a new page. The notes for future lectures are copies from a previous year’s notes, which give you a preview of what is to come in this year’s lectures. Those later notes will be updated to correspond to what is said in this year’s lectures shortly after each lecture takes place. Wednesday, January 10, 2007 Why you are in CS103 instead of the courses for Computer Science majors and Computer Engineering majors—CS101, which teaches Java, followed by CS251, which teaches C++? Some answers: o Everyone in the School needs to learn some computer science To write programs that you can use to solve problems; To write programs that others will use to solve problems. o C++ is perfect for CS and CompE majors, who spend 4 hard years learning how to write programs in the second category. Java is almost as good. o C++ is a disaster when writing programs that only you are going to use. o Matlab is perfect for writing programs that only you are going to use. o Matlab is perfect for engineering and science applications. o Matlab is perfect for solutions to numerical applications. o C++ is weak for engineering, science, and numerical applications. Look at online testimonies at www.mathworks.com (click on Industries at the top, then click on one of linked industries , then click on User Stories at the left). Then click on the chosen example. Computer science is the study of algorithms for processing information with computers. An algorithm is a precise step-by-step procedure for performing a task. o Example: Leave this room Go out the door. Is this an algorithm? No, because it is not precise. o Example: Leave this room Is this an algorithm? Yes. Is it part of computer science? No, because it does not
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process information. o Example: Build a killer vocabulary Is this an algorithm? Yes. Is it part of computer science? No because, while it processes information, it cannot do it with a computer. o Example: Process webpage data for amazon.com Display list of book titles with authors. If title clicked, display first 12 pages. If “Close” clicked, close the page. Is this an algorithm? Yes Is this part of computer science? Yes Is it a numerical algorithm? No o Example: Add the first 100 numbers together. Set sum = 0 for all the integers n = 1 to 100 sum = sum + n Is this an algorithm? Yes Is this part of computer science? Yes. Is it a numerical algorithm? Yes. Example areas of computer science: Algorithms (solve puzzles) Artificial Intelligence (mimic human thought) Graphics (make pictures, games, movies) Information Processing & Storage (e.g., databases) Image Processing (improve/inspect pictures) Networks (local, Internet, computers, phones) Operating Systems (e.g., Windows, Linux, OS X) Software Engineering (i.e., design large programs) User Interfaces (determine what the user sees and does) Programming Numerical Algorithms.
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CS 103 S2 Highlights - In-class notes for CS 103, Updated...

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