ANSC311-Is it your horse or you paper

ANSC311-Is it your horse or you paper - Maddi Williams ANSC...

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Maddi Williams ANSC 311 15 Nov 2007 Is It Your Horse Or You? -How to better your self as your horse’s trainer AQHA Journal Target audience: Beginner - Professional Any level of rider could benefit from thinking about how Self Discipline, Respect, and Balance can improve their horses training.
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For most people one simple phrase defines horse training, “What can I make my horse do?” For others, there is a deeper, more intense connection with the concept of training a horse. The ability to train a horse is determined by two factors, the horse and the trainer. More simply stated, a horse will only be as good as it’s trainer. What one trainer accomplishes with a horse, may not have possible if the horse was trained elsewhere. To understand the process of horse training we will need to break down the fundamental components of what makes a good trainer. Clint Haverty helped us break down the key elements. We will share his explanations on how self discipline, respect, and balance intertwine in the world of training horses. We will also suggest different methods of putting the key elements to work for your horse. Peripheral Vision We all know that other people sometimes judge us for how we look, the clothes we wear, and what we do, but people are not the only ones judging. One easily forgotten concept is, our horses are completely aware of the statements we make with our body. A first impression with a horse can be a lasting one. From the minute the stall door is opened, or the pasture gate undone, the horse is studying body language. Self awareness must start from the minute you walk out the door to work with your horse. The key to self awareness is being conscious of your surroundings. Another term that is closely related to self awareness is self discipline. Self discipline as it pertains to horses can be described as the ability to do things we are asked to do, and translating that to the ability to have our horse perform the things we ask of them, in a correct fashion. Clint adds, “Self disciple is a very big word, to succeed in this world we have to be disciplinarians not only with our horses but our selves.” There are three
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fundamentals to acquiring self discipline in training horses. The first is subliminal, second is physical, and the third is mental. Attitude “Remember that on any given day your mood will have a direct influence on your training. A good mood won’t give you or your horse any more talent or smarts, but it will let you live up to your potential,” states Mike Kevil. In most instances there is a direct correlation between a trainer’s attitude and a horse’s. “Keep a positive attitude with every aspect of training. If you go to your horse with a negative attitude it will carry over, if you go with positive attitude
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ANSC311-Is it your horse or you paper - Maddi Williams ANSC...

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