Organizational Structure PADM 620.docx - Behrens |1 Organizational Structure Models of Organizational Structure and the Effects on Public Service

Organizational Structure PADM 620.docx - Behrens |1...

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B e h r e n s | 1 Organizational Structure Models of Organizational Structure and the Effects on Public Service Motivation Nathanyl Behrens Liberty University Dr. Jimmy Johnson PADM 620 March 28, 2020
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B e h r e n s | 2 Organizational Structure Introduction Throughout the history of public administration and management there have been several organizational designs, employed by businesses in order to obtain their organizational goals. While many businesses have implemented these models successfully, just as many have been crippled by implementing them wrong, specifically regarding public service motivation. Public service motivation is an attribute of non-government and governmental organizations that seek to understand and explain why certain individuals have a desire or need to server the public. Public service motivations also seeks to understand not only the motivation of the employee but their “productivity, improved management practices, accountability, and trust in government, making it one of the major topics of investigation in public administration today” [ CITATION Moy07 \l 1033 ]. There are three main and widely accepted organizational designs, bureaucratic, matrix, and team based. In this paper I will seek to explain these organizational models and how they related to public service motivation and evaluate them according to biblical principles. Bureaucratic Design A bureaucratic design module is the most common and widely accepted of the three and can been seen in most businesses. It is a traditional Pyramid form, an example of this is with the boss at the top, then managers, then supervisors, and then average employees at the bottom. Max Weber a German political sociologist and the originator of the term bureaucratic model constructed this module on the principles of Fredrick Taylors theory of scientific management. Weber’s organizational theory would be run by rules and regulations and follow five key elements. “Division of labor and functional specialization” [ CITATION Sha17 \l 1033 ] allowing for the division of work based of the purpose in hopes to eliminate unnecessary redundancies. A hierarchal chain of command. A formal set of rules and guidelines to ensure the
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B e h r e n s | 3 Organizational Structure stability and fairness of an organization. The maintenance of records so that past decisions can be reexamined, and mistakes not made again or for a precedent set [ CITATION Sha17 \l 1033 ]. Lastly professionalism, meaning, “a permanent fixed office for each career employee; selection on the basis of technical qualifications; and remuneration in the form of a fixed cash salary with a right to a pension” [ CITATION Ala09 \l 1033 ]. One of the main reasons this theory is effective at motivating employees is the promise or prospect of promotion. Promotions are an intrinsic motivator to many employees. Not only do promotions often come with a pay raise and better benefits, but also an increase in one’s role within the company and greater responsibilities[ CITATION Smi14 \l 1033 ]. Another motivator
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