John Stuart Mill Notes

John Stuart Mill Notes - Introduction-John Stuart Mill...

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Introduction-John Stuart Mill Mill’s Life o Born May 20, 1806 in London o Education-father wanted him to have first rate education, educated entirely by his father, James Mill, began reading Greek at age 3, by age 8 he was able to translate classics from Ancient Greek and Ancient Latin into English o “mental crisis” (nervous breakdown)-age 21 Recovery-found his capacity for emotion was not dead o “public intellectual” o Newspaper/journal writer and editor (engaging in public debates through newspapers and journals) o British East India Company employee-clerk o Rector of St. Andrew’s University in Scotland o Member of Parliament (1865-1868) o Co wrote with a married woman-Harriet Taylor (was married to a man who was pretty well off, could provide for her and that she had an affection to, but not equally intellectual), he doesn’t want her to associate with Mill, leaves for Paris, comes back and tells her husband to deal with her spending him with Mill and tells Mill to deal with the fact that she is married, Harriet and Mill are in love with each other o Married her on her husband’s death o Retired in Avignon, France, but kept writing o Harriet’s daughter served as Mill’s secretary, took care of him after Harriet died o Died in 1873 Mill’s England
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o Industrial Revolution-radical changes in society o Monarchy Kings George III, George IV and William IV, general decreases in monarchy’s power Queen Victoria (1837-1901)-power limited even further o Parliament (legislative branch) House of Commons-most common branch, land owning elites elected from boroughs House of Lords-upper house in Parliament, members by virtue of hereditary Franchise-“the vote,” limited to landowners, 440,000 out of 17 million Reform Acts of 1832 and 1867, rose number of votes to about 717,000, power to middle class (1832), 1867-redistributed seats of Parliament, increased number of voters, women and lower class could still not vote Prime Minister-executive-the government includes the prime minister and subordinate ministers, prime minister is selected from the Parliament Rotten Boroughs-very small groups Two Theories of Government o Practical Act-choose goals you want then design government to meet that o Natural History-the government arises from people’s nature Study what people are like then design government Mill believes some of both o Can choose based on goals, but…
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o People must be suited for government o No one government is suited for all people at all times Ideally best form of government-for best suited for advanced people o Two criteria Promotion of the good management of public affairs (given the current state of the people) Improvement in people active, intellectual and more faculties (A.I.M.) Mill rejects Enlightened Despotism
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John Stuart Mill Notes - Introduction-John Stuart Mill...

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