Midterm Chapter Notes.docx - FRHD*2100 Textbook...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 62 pages.

FRHD*2100 Textbook Notes --Chapter 1: What is Human Sexuality?0000 Perspectives on Human Sexuality The Historical Perspective Sexuality and art in prehistory and antiquity o Art produced in the Stone Age suggest the worship of women’s ability to bear children and perpetuate the species o Primitive statues and cave drawings portray women with large, pendulous breasts, rounded hips, and prominent sex organs o Most researchers regard these as fertility symbols o Emphasis on the female reproductive role may also signify ignorance of the male’s contribution to reproduction o As the climate warmed (out of the ice age) the human species turned agrarian; hunters and gatherers became farmers and herders o As people became aware of the male role in reproduction, phallic worship (veneration of the penis as a symbol of generative power) sprang into being (~9,000 B.C.). The penis was glorified as a plough, axe, or sword o Phallic symbols (an object that represents the penis) figured in religious ceremonies in ancient Egypt – the ancient Greeks created art that suggests they revered phalluses, rendering them sometimes as rings or necklaces o Some phalluses were given wings, suggesting the power ascribed to them o In ancient Rome, a large phallus was carried like a float in s parade honouring Venus, the god of love o The incest taboo (prohibition against intercourse with close blood relatives) that discourages sexual intercourse between close blood relatives may have been the first taboo o All human societies apparently have some form of incest taboo (though its strictness may vary from culture to culture) o Brother-sister marriages were permitted among the presumably divine rulers of ancient Egypt and royal families of the Incas and Hawaiians. Incestuous relationships in these royal bloodlines may have kept wealth, power, and “divinity” in the family The Ancient Hebrews o Viewed sex (within marriage) as a fulfilling experience intended to satisfy the divine injunction to “be fruitful and multiply” o Same-sex sexual behaviours were strongly condemned – thought to threaten perpetuation of the family o Adultery was also condemned (at least for women)
FRHD*2100 Textbook Notes o They permitted polygamy (the practice of having two or more spouses at a time) but the vast majority of Hebrews practiced monogamy (one spouse) o Approved sex within marriage not simply for procreation, but also for mutual pleasure and fulfillment – it helped strengthen marital bonds and solidify families o A wife was considered her husband’s property – if she offended him, she could be divorced on a limb, and could be stoned to death for adultery o She might have to share her husband with his secondary wives and concubines o Men who committed adultery by consorting with the wives of other men were considered to have violated that latter’s property rights (may be punished, but not sentenced to death) The Ancient Greeks.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture