Q1 L-lysine is an essential amino acid but the...

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Introduction to General, Organic and Biochemistry
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Chapter 23 / Exercise 23-32
Introduction to General, Organic and Biochemistry
Brown
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Week 3 16/08/13 300816 Cell Biology LECTURE Lecturer: Tony Haigh REVISION Q1. L-lysine is an essential amino acid but the stereoisomer D-lysine is not. Why can the human body only utilise one form? 1. Antibodies recognise the D form and destroy it 2. Enzymes can only recognise one form 3. As L and D forms are enantiomers they bind and inhibit each other 4. As L and D forms are chiral molecules they bind and inhibit each other
Q2. Common lipids for energy storage are Q3. Which of the following is not a component of nucleic acids?
Lecture 3: MEMBRANES The whole of chapter 5 Fundamental properties Highlighted in this lecture are the following: Cell organisation Ordered complexity Energy utilisation Homeostasis Thermodynamics 1 Thermodynamics 2 Conservation of matter Structure-function Cell membrane made o f phospholipids and proteins which are the structure/function and some have sugars attached. Membranes do things = function. They do work and to do this they require energy = Laws of Thermodynamics. Are well ordered = ordered complexity. Have to be put together the right way = ordered Cell has to have concentrations of things in a particular range = homeostasis Membrane Structure Fluid mosaic model Are understood to be a mixture of things and have a particular structure/pattern Are a fluid Work like other fluids but is hydrophobic not hydrophilic like water. Made of 32 main parts Structure part = phospholipid Proteins - are integral or peripheral, peripheral sit on outside or inside of bilayer Proteins allow things across or through membrane Transmembrane proteins important for getting things across membrane and to recognise what things are. Markers allow them to recognise what kind of cell they are.
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Introduction to General, Organic and Biochemistry
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Chapter 23 / Exercise 23-32
Introduction to General, Organic and Biochemistry
Brown
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Week 3 16/08/13 300816 Cell Biology LECTURE Lecturer: Tony Haigh Detect things that are foreign, cell surface markers very important for this. Cholesterol is a stiffening factor, makes membrane a little less fluid and keeps it tightly packed. Once plasma membraneis broken is no longer a cell, is the boundary, determines what can and can’t cross and lets cell know what is inside and outside the cell environment. 4 functions of membrane: 1. Recognising what kind of cell it is 2. Finding out what is outside 3. Letting things out 4. Letting things in Fluid Mosaic Model Cholesterol sits in between phospholipids, creates rigidity, fill in spaces between head groups where there are unsaturated fatty acids. Glycoproteins Sugars are attached to proteins, are sometimes attached to lipids. Sugars make it slimy and slippery Proteins in extracellular matrix are collagen and elastin, are sugars as well, have to be attached to the membrane or it will fall apart.

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