{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

Nature v Nurture - Serial Killer Essay

Nature v Nurture - Serial Killer Essay - Nature Vs Nurture...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Nature Vs. Nurture: Inside the Serial Killer The question of whether or not man is predetermined at birth to lead a life of crime is a question that has been debated for decades. Are serial killers born with the predisposition to become killers? Do the traits of a serial killer become a part of them because of a traumatic childhood? While some think that all babies are born inherently good, and develop either for better or for worse, others believe that it is impossible for society to have so much corruption unless there are some “bad seeds” roaming the streets. If serial killers are made and not born, we can do little to prevent them. However the odds that they are born a serial killer are very slim considering the idea that many serial killers have abusive childhoods. Those who have a predisposition of mental disorders from family history though, have a higher tendency to become serial killers if their parents or guardians raise them poorly or if they have a traumatic experience in their childhood. Nature and nurture come into play strongly during one's childhood, the time when people endure many major behavioral and personality developments. The Merriam-Webster Dictionary defines nature as "the genetically controlled qualities of an organism" ("Nature," def. 8). While nature can influence the disorders that a person has and the physical state they live in, nurture, "the sum of the environmental factors influencing the behavior and traits expressed by an organism," influences the expression of one's physical traits ("Nurture," def. 3).The personality therefore, does not result from a single gene, be it a kindness gene, or a killer gene, but results in a combination of genetic predispositions, combined with a person's upbringing. A classic example of a serial killer, Ted Bundy's disturbing childhood demonstrates the importance of an ideal childhood and that having a problematic childhood may contribute more than genetics towards countless murders. As a child, Bundy's mother, Eleanor Louise Cowell,
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
and his "mentally unstable" and violent grandmother functioned as his parents since his father left when Cowell gave birth to Ted out of wedlock (Wikipedia). Growing up, his family told people that Cowell adopted him so as to not reveal the fact that Cowell had Bundy out of wedlock. Bundy and his mother later moved to Washington State so that Bundy's uncle could help support the family. There, Bundy seemed intelligent, but had trouble associating with people. Psychologists believe that the lack of a typical family structure and an abnormal childhood acts as one of the main contributors to the series of Bundy's personality disorders.
Image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern