Jazz Notes Study Guide Ch 2

Jazz Notes Study Guide Ch 2 - Sweet Bands(32): played less...

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Sweet Bands(32): played less syncopated, slower pieces, such as ballads and popular songs Vibrato(47): A method of varying the pitch frequency of a note, producing a wavering sound. Its heard mostly of wind instruments, strings, and vocals Break(49): in which the band stopped and allowed a soloist to play alone but without losing the beat New Orleans Jazz (50): often called Dixieland, originated and flourished in late 1910’s and 1920’s in New Orleans. The new Orleans jazz band often had a front line of trumpet or cornet, trombone, and clarinet, accompanied by a rhythm section of piano, guitar or banjo, bass, and drums Dixieland (50): known as new Orleans jazz Chicago Jazz(51): Type of New Orleans style jazz created by Chicago musicians in the 1920’s Hot Bands(52): featured faster tempos and dramatic solo and group performances, usually with more improvisation than sweet bands had Speakeasy(52): prohibition clubs in which alcohol was sold illegally Mute(56): Devices played in or over the bells of brass instruments to alter their tones Plunger(60): Type of mute/ Rubber cup of the plunger is held against the bell of the instrument and manipulated with altered with the left hand to alter the horn’s tone
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This note was uploaded on 04/08/2008 for the course MUSC 175 taught by Professor Spittal during the Spring '08 term at Gonzaga.

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Jazz Notes Study Guide Ch 2 - Sweet Bands(32): played less...

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