10birthtragedy

10birthtragedy - Commentary on Nietzsches The Birth of...

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Commentary on Nietzsche’s The Birth of Tragedy The context Nietzsche contextualizes this work to a large extent in the “Attempt at Self-Criticism,” which he wrote 14 years after publication. In this attempt Nietzsche puts in question the received interpretation of Greek culture based on the harmony and peacefulness of Greek art during the “classical” age: statuary and architecture. He challenges this reception of the Greeks and Greek art - its “alleged ‘cheerfulness’” – by insisting that the art of an earlier age - the pre-Socratic age -, involving music and tragedy, constitutes a more authentic art form of Greek culture, rendering the “truth” of life or the world in terms of the Heraclitean view of incessant coming into being and passing away (8), and the “double orbit of all things.” (94) The Heraclitean “truth,” which involves us in the both-and of metaphor or musical/poetic language instead of the either/or of conceptual (oppositional) language, is characterized by Nietzsche as “superabundance” (4) or “excess” (27). Since this “excess,” this “doubleness,” subverts all simplicities, such as beginning and end, any search for a cause (ultimate ground) or striving for an ultimate end or purpose that would be declared
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10birthtragedy - Commentary on Nietzsches The Birth of...

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