commentarydeath_in_venice_2

commentarydeath_in_venice_2 - Commentary on Death in Venice...

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Commentary on Death in Venice In my interpretation, which you will find echoed in the commentary in our edition, Thomas Mann stages in this Novella the Nietzschean agon (conflict) between the Apollonian and the Dionysian, that is, between the constructive and destructive forces, in the figure of Gustav Aschenbach. Thus the Apollonian aspect manifests itself in Aschenbach’s writing as an asceticism for the sake of achieving a perfection that is the result of conscious planning or intentionality, and constitutes “the daily scene of an inflexible, cold, and passionate service.” (5) Note here the teleological perspective, associated with Parmenideanism- Platonism, as when Aschenbach refers to his writing as being under the “obligation of productivity,” (5) and unity, “the shadow of a single idea.” (7) Note as well the dedication to “clarity,” (7) “discipline,” (8) “mastery in the realm of beauty,” (10) and a “heroism” that had won him “dignity.” (10) Aschenbach opposes this notion of writing and literature to any practice, such as irony, that would result in the groundlessness of doubleness, of the
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commentarydeath_in_venice_2 - Commentary on Death in Venice...

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