Terror Management Theory

Terror Management Theory - 1 Terror Management Theory The...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
1 Terror Management Theory The George Washington University Social Psychology –PSYC 12:13 Dr. Stephen Forssell
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
2 Terror Management Theory Conflict resolution and its applications to threatening feelings is  immediately applicable in social and world issues. A study linking feelings of an  imminent threat and an intense response based on emotional cues shows that  threats to survival increase responses based solely on emotion and intensify  Pyszczynski, 1997).   Terror management theory was developed by three graduate students,  Sheldon Solomon, Jeff Greenberg, and Tom Pyszczynski in the late 1980’s. It  focuses on the idea that when reminded of their own impending morality, people  cling harder to their cultural structures and become more hostile towards views  that threaten their  cultural security. The theory is based on an evolutionary  perspective of psychology, with human motivations being mainly coordinated to  ensure survival. (Solomon, Greenberg, & Pyszczynski, 1997) There are a few 
Background image of page 2
differing opinions in the psychological community that have developed over this  view. David M. Buss (1997) wrote that in the basis for the theory Solomon,  Greenberg, and Pyszczynski developed failed to fully  3 acknowledge the true foundation of evolutionary theory, that survival is only  important as it relates to reproduction, and only a motivation when reproduction is  involved. Another study examines the limits to Terror Management Theory and  followed by an examination of the theory using Occam’s Razor, slimming the  complex issues that had arisen around the theory and simplifying Terror  Management Theory down to its base parts (Snyder, 1997). Finally, a study done  by Reuben M. Baron (1997) examines the social implications of Terror  Management Theory. Carol and Asher (2001) analyzed data regarding perceived threat levels in  Israel, using annual distributed public opinion polls. They show that the higher the  perceived threat, the more likely a person is to be willing to engage in conflict  with another, in this case Israelis supporting conflict with Arab peoples in times of  a greater perceived threat.  The data shows a clear correlation not only with 
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
increased conflict and increased threat, but a decrease in support for a Palestinian  state in times of increased threat, and increased support in lower threat periods. The survey used had a comprehensive list of questions about the style of 
Background image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 13

Terror Management Theory - 1 Terror Management Theory The...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 5. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online