1.1 - AE 2020 INTRODUCTION A bit of history Fluid mechanics...

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AE 2020 INTRODUCTION A bit of history Fluid mechanics is a very old field. Over three centuries ago, Sir Isaac Newton devoted an entire book in his work known as Principia Mathematica to fluid mechanics (1687). Newton believed that fluid dynamics could be modeled by viewing fluid molecules as rigid particles that obey the classical particle equations of motion. He developed a model for the lift coefficient generated by the airfoils. This model assumed that when the fluid particles hit a solid surface, they lose all their momentum in a direction normal to the surface, and thereafter slide down the sides of the body. This model stated that a 2 sin 2 = l C In 1777, D'Alembert (a French scientist) did a series of experiments on ships in canals, and proved that the above equation is wrong. In 1781, Euler (a Swiss Engineer) used theoretical reasoning to show that lift coefficient should be proportional to sin α , and not to sin 2 α . Later on we will see that lift behaves like a p sin 2 = l C From such humble beginnings and false steps, the field of fluid mechanics grew. Many researchers such as Lilienthal (1890s) and Langley (1906) worked on the development of airfoils, gliders and wings. Other researchers and engineers (Rankine 1820-1872, Froude, de Laval, Pelton) worked on turbomachinery, pumps, wind mills and so on, which relied on aerodynamic principles.
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"If birds can glide for long periods of time, then . .. why can't I? " Orville Wright - 1899 At 10:35 a.m. on a cold, blustery morning, Dec. 17, 1903, Orville Wright carved his place in history by making the first manned, heavier-than-air, powered flight at Kitty Hawk, N.C. The rest is aviation history! Aerodynamics is a broad field Today, aerodynamics (and fluid mechanics) covers a variety of topics from very low speed incompressible flow (around an insect) to hypersonic flow at Mach 30+ around a reentry vehicle. The flows are viscous, unsteady, compressible, three-dimensional. The fluids may be liquids, air or gas molecules, or ions. As aerospace engineers, you will be called from time to time to solve a variety of internal and external flows. Some of them may be in areas that may appear to have nothing to do with aerospace engineering - e.g. internal cooling of computer systems, flow through ducts and pipes under the hood of an automotive engine, automobile aerodynamics, air-conditioning system design, centrifugal compressors, etc., etc. Our courses and electives (and a life-long commitment on your part to keep up with the technology) will prepare you for all of these, and more.
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How are the AE Undergraduate Courses organized? The aerodynamics courses prepare you for tackling a wide variety of problems.
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1.1 - AE 2020 INTRODUCTION A bit of history Fluid mechanics...

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