Lower Leg, Ankle and Foot

Achillestendinitis athletenotresting

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Unformatted text preview: to add stretching with resistance Dynamic pronation exercises Jogging and running program • ONLY with proper shoeware Medial Tibial Stress Syndrome Medial Return to play guidelines • Minimal to no pain to palpation of affected area • All causes of excessive pronation have been addressed • Sufficient gastrocnemius and soleus flexibility • Successful functional testing Achilles Tendinitis/Ruptures Achilles Mechanism of Injury: • Achilles Tendinitis Inflammatory condition • • • Excessive tensile stress Overload of jumping or running Gradual onset of pain • Achilles Tendon Ruptures Sudden plantarflexion • Jumping or acceleration Rehabilitation Concerns: • Achilles Tendinitis: Athlete NOT resting • Achilles Tendon Ruptures • WILL lead to postsurgical considerations Incisions Muscular atrophy Achilles Tendinitis/Ruptures Achilles Rehabilitation Progression: • Activity modification Necessary to allow Achilles tendon to begin its healing process Removal of immobilization if present • • • • Proper footwear RICE Increase ROM Decrease swelling and pain Achilles Tendinitis/Ruptures Achilles Return to play guidelines: FULL resolution of pain/symptoms and AROM ROM, strength, flexibility, and endurance equal to opposite leg • All contributing biomechanical faults have been addressed • Successful functional testing • • Rehabilitation of Ankle and Foot Injuries and Ankle and Foot Functional Anatomy and Biomechanics and The Talocrural joint or the ankle joint is a hinge joint. The Talocrural joint, also known as the ankle mortise, is made up of the medial and lateral malleolus and the talus. Movements in this joint consist of dorsiflexion and plantarflexion. Motions range from 20 degrees of dorsiflexion and 50 degrees of plantarflexion. Ankle and Foot Functional Anatomy and Biomechanics and Talocrural Joint Ankle and Foot Functional Anatomy and Biomechanics and Talocrural joint ligaments consist of three lateral ligaments, two ligaments that connect the tibia and fibula, and the medial or deltoid ligaments. The three lateral ligaments are the anterior and posterior talofibular and the calcaneofibular. Connecting the tibia and fibula are the anterior and posterior tibiofibular ligaments. The deltoid ligaments (ATTL,PTTL,TNL,TCL) provides primary resistance to eversion. Ankle and Foot Functional Anatomy and Biomechanics and Ankle and Foot Functional Anatomy and Biomechanics and Talocrural joint muscles consist of • Anterior Extensor hallucis longus, extensor digitorum longus, peroneus tertius, and the tibialis anterior. • Posterior (superficial) Gastrocnemius (middle) Soleus, and plantaris (deep) Tibialis posterior, flexor digitorum longus, and flexor hallucis longus Ankle and Foot Functional Anatomy and Biomechanics and Ankle and Foot Functional Anatomy and Biomechanics and Subtalar joint • • • Talus and Calcaneus Movements are pronation and supination Triplanar movements Midtarsal joint • Calcaneocuboid and Talonavicular joints • Depends on ligamentous and muscular tension Ankle and Foot Functional Anatomy and Biomechanics and Midtarsal Joint Ankle and Foot Functional Anatomy and Biomechanics and Effects of midtarsal joint position during pronation • • • • • • • • • • Talus adducts/plantarflexes Foot muscles fire out of sync Lower extremity internally ro...
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This note was uploaded on 01/12/2014 for the course ATHT 333 taught by Professor Unknown during the Spring '11 term at S.E. Louisiana.

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