Inferences on Two Populations

B c d ptdf28 29 ptdf28 29 2ptdf28 29 2ptdf28

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: stics G. University of South Carolina; Slide 19 The p-value for this test is A. B. C. D. P(tdf=28 > 2.9) P(tdf=28 < 2.9) 2*P(tdf=28 > 2.9) 2*P(tdf=28 < 2.9) G. Baker, Department of Statistics G. University of South Carolina; Slide 20 Suppose the Populations are not Suppose Independent Independent Examples: Examples: – Weights before and after a given diet. – Reflex time to two different stimuli. – Measurements obtained by two different Measurements instruments. instruments. – Comparison of two medical treatments. G. Baker, Department of Statistics G. University of South Carolina; Slide 21 Paired Differences We reduce the two populations down to one population of differences. one We assume that the differences are drawn from a normal population. from We will treat the differences as one population and estimate their mean and perform hypothesis tests on their mean. perform Why pair measurements? Why G. Baker, Department of Statistics G. University of South Carolina; Slide 22 Paired D...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 01/12/2014 for the course STA 509 taught by Professor Wang during the Fall '13 term at South Carolina.

Ask a homework question - tutors are online